Quantcast

Pipeline Explosion Kills 7, Injures 25 in Bangladesh

Energy
At least seven people have died in a Bangladesh pipeline explosion. Youtube screenshot

At least seven people were killed when a gas pipeline exploded in Bangladesh Sunday, and another 25 were injured, the Associated Press reported.


The blast collapsed portions of the boundary wall of a building in the city of Chittagong while residents were getting ready for work in the morning, according to local police chief Mohammed Mohsin.

"So far we have confirmed about seven dead bodies, including one child, four males, and two females who were severely burned on the spot," Bijoy Boshak, deputy commissioner of the Chottogram Metropolitan Police (North), told Anadolu Agency.

The seven who died were all members of one family, Indus News reported.

Boshak told Anadolu Agency that the seven who died were rushed to the hospital, where they were pronounced dead on arrival.

Among the injured, one suffered burns, and the rest were wounded when the walls collapsed, according to reports from local channel Shomoy TV shared by Anadolu Agency. Boshak said the death toll could rise, since some of the people admitted to the hospital were in critical condition.

The gate of a nearby building and a minibus in its garage were also damaged by the blast.

Fire service official Amir Hossain told Reuters that the cause of the explosion was not yet known, but was being investigated.

"We primarily came to know that due to the gas pipeline blast, a part of a building collapsed," Boshak told Anadolu Agency.

The explosion comes one month after seven children died when a gas cylinder used for inflating balloons exploded in the Bangladeshi capital of Dhaka, Reuters noted.

The news agency further pointed out that poorly monitored gas pipelines and cylinders are a frequent cause of accidents in Bangladesh.

Pipeline explosions aren't the only danger that fossil fuels pose to the low-lying country, however.

Bangladesh faced the third-most risk from hazards related to the climate crisis of any country in the world, according to the 2019 Global Peace Index.

"Bangladesh has been one of the most vulnerable countries to the impacts of climate change although the country has no significant role for it," the country's Prime Minister Sheikh Hasina said in a keynote address at the "Dhaka Global Dialogue-2019" this month. "As a result, floods, cyclones, droughts and other natural disasters can threaten people's lives and livelihoods."

Indeed, while the country only contributes about 0.3 percent to global greenhouse gas emissions, it could lose 20 percent of its land mass with only three feet of sea level rise, which would displace more than 30 million people. A UN report warned in September that global sea levels could rise three feet by 2100 if action is not taken to fight global warming.

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

One species of walking shark. Mark Erdmann, California Academy of Sciences

Scientists have identified four new species of walking shark in the waters off Australia and New Guinea.

Read More
A new study shows that half of all Arctic warming and corresponding sea-loss during the late 20th century was caused by ozone-depleting substances. Here, icebergs discharged from Greenland's Jakobshavn Glacier. Kevin Krajick / Earth Institute / EurekAlert!

The world awakened to the hole in the ozone layer in 1985, which scientists attributed it to ozone-depleting substances. Two years later, in Montreal, the world agreed to ban the halogen compounds causing the massive hole over Antarctica. Research now shows that those chemicals didn't just cut a hole in the ozone layer, they also warmed up the Arctic.

Read More
Sponsored
Diane Wilson holds up a bag full of nurdles she collected from one of Formosa's outfall areas on Jan. 15. Julie Dermansky / DeSmogBlog

By Julie Dermansky

On the afternoon of Jan. 15, activist Diane Wilson kicked off a San Antonio Estuary Waterkeeper meeting on the side of the road across from a Formosa plastics manufacturing plant in Point Comfort, Texas.

After Wilson and the waterkeeper successfully sued Formosa in 2017, the company agreed to no longer release even one of the tiny plastic pellets known as nurdles into the region's waterways. The group of volunteers had assembled that day to check whether the plant was still discharging these raw materials of plastics manufacturing.

Read More

By Simon Coghlan and Kobi Leins

A remarkable combination of artificial intelligence (AI) and biology has produced the world's first "living robots."

Read More
Malaysian Environment Minister Yeo Bee Yin (front 2nd L) and officials inspect a container containing plastic waste shipment on Jan. 20, 2020 before sending back to the countries of origin. AFP via Getty Images

The Southeast Asian country Malaysia has sent 150 shipping containers packed with plastic waste back to 13 wealthy countries, putting the world on notice that it will not be the world's garbage dump, as CNN reported. The countries receiving their trash back include the United States, the United Kingdom, France and Canada.

Read More