Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Help Support EcoWatch

Banana Milk: The Newest Alternative to Milk

Popular

No longer do vegans or the dairy intolerant have to suffer! Alternative milks are becoming ever more popular. Sure, you’ve got your classic soy that exists ubiquitously in every cafe in the world, but now many establishments are also serving (sometimes homemade) varieties of almond, hemp, cashew, oat, rice and coconut milks.

But, are you still unsatisfied with these options? Perhaps you’re allergic to nuts, you avoid soy or simply are bored or the same old alternative milks. Well, did you know there is an incredibly cheap and easy-to-make vegan milk alternative that you can concoct with the ingredients in your kitchen? Meet banana milk.

High in potassium, vitamin B6 and pectin, banana milk is nutritious and full of filling fiber. It has a light, sweet flavor and costs pennies to make. If one banana costs $0.25, then your glass of banana milk shouldn’t cost much more than a quarter.

They are an energizing fruit that is especially great as a pre or post-workout snack. They can reduce muscle fatigue and fight off cramps and are very gentle on an unsettled stomach, which means they may be great for those who have trouble consuming a traditional breakfast.

Recently picking up in popularity, banana milk may be the cheap, accessible and nutritious milk you’ve been searching for. While making homemade milk substitutes is relatively simpler, cheaper and tastier than buying in the store, alternative milks are by no means cheap. A carton of organic almond milk costs $1.99 at Whole Foods, but has a lot of extraneous additives.

Homemade from organic almonds at Whole Foods, one site estimated that making an equivalent amount of organic almond milk at home would cost around $1.75, but takes at least one day of advanced planning. To make your own nut milks, the nuts must be soaked overnight, whereas you can just pop a few frozen bananas into your blender and have banana milk within 2 minutes. Intriguingly, banana milk is the only fruit-based milk, meaning some people might find it more easily digestible than nut or grain milks.

Gluten-free, raw, vegan and paleo, try making banana milk at home tomorrow morning!

Banana Milk (serves 1)

1 frozen banana

1 cup water

1/4 tsp. cinnamon

pinch sea salt

Combine all ingredients in blender. Blend until smooth. Pour into a glass and enjoy.

You can also add a spoonful of unsweetened cocoa powder and a dash of vanilla extract for delicious chocolate banana milk or soak some oats and add them to the blender and strain for homemade banana-oat milk. It’s like banana bread in a mug.

YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE 

Ben & Jerry’s Launches Vegan Ice Cream Line With 4 Non-Dairy Flavors

Dr. Mark Hyman: Why Vegetable Oils Should Not Be Part of Your Diet

11 Reasons Why You Should Eat More Bananas

What Role Does Nutrition Play in ADHD?

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

Pexels

By Shawna Foo

Anyone who's tending a garden right now knows what extreme heat can do to plants. Heat is also a concern for an important form of underwater gardening: growing corals and "outplanting," or transplanting them to restore damaged reefs.

Read More Show Less
Malte Mueller / Getty Images

By David Korten

Our present course puts humans on track to be among the species that expire in Earth's ongoing sixth mass extinction. In my conversations with thoughtful people, I am finding increasing acceptance of this horrific premise.

Read More Show Less
Women sort potatoes in the Andes Mountains near Cusco Peru on July 7, 2014. Thomas O'Neill / NurPhoto / Getty Images

By Alejandro Argumedo

August 9 is the International Day of the World's Indigenous Peoples – a celebration of the uniqueness of the traditions of Quechua, Huli, Zapotec, and thousands of other cultures, but also of the universality of potatoes, bananas, beans, and the rest of the foods that nourish the world. These crops did not arise out of thin air. They were domesticated over thousands of years, and continue to be nurtured, by Indigenous people. On this day we give thanks to these cultures for the diversity of our food.

Read More Show Less
A sand tiger shark swims over the USS Tarpon in Monitor National Marine Sanctuary. Tane Casserley / NOAA

By John R. Platt

Here at The Revelator, we love a good shark story.

The problem is, there aren't all that many good shark stories. According to recent research, sharks and their relatives represent one of the world's most imperiled groups of species. Of the more than 1,250 known species of sharks, skates, rays and chimeras — collectively known as chondrichthyan fishes — at least a quarter are threatened with extinction.

Read More Show Less
The Anderson Community Group. Left to right, Caroline Laur, Anita Foust, the Rev. Bryon Shoffner, and Bill Compton, came together to fight for environmental justice in their community. Anderson Community Group

By Isabella Garcia

On Thanksgiving Day 2019, right after Caroline Laur had finished giving thanks for her home, a neighbor at church told her that a company had submitted permit requests to build an asphalt plant in their community. The plans indicated the plant would be 250 feet from Laur's backdoor.

Read More Show Less
Berber woman cooks traditional flatbread using an earthen oven in her mud-walled village home located near the historic village of Ait Benhaddou in Morocco, Africa on Jan. 4, 2016. Creative Touch Imaging Ltd. /NurPhoto / Getty Images

By Danielle Nierenberg and Jason Flatt

The world's Indigenous Peoples face severe and disproportionate rates of food insecurity. While Indigenous Peoples comprise 5 percent of the world's population, they account for 15 percent of the world's poor, according to the World Health Organization.

Read More Show Less

Trending

Danny Choo / CC BY-SA 2.0

By Olivia Sullivan

One of the many unfortunate outcomes of the coronavirus pandemic has been the quick and obvious increase in single-use plastic products. After COVID-19 arrived in the United States, many grocery stores prohibited customers from using reusable bags, coffee shops banned reusable mugs, and takeout food with plastic forks and knives became the new normal.

Read More Show Less