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Ban Fracking Now!

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Photo credit: Food & Water Watch Marlyand / Twitter

For the record, I'm against Hydraulic fracturing or fracking for short.

I'm against people who are for and do Hydraulic fracturing.

Reason: People have a right to clean air and clean water. (PERIOD)

This is not about Republican or Democrat it's about humanity and putting people before profits. Climate change is a public health and a civil rights issue that affects the communities that I support and work for, particularly African-Americans and low-income families. They are often hit the hardest by climate change and carbon pollution.

But, while many of us in the climate movement have been protesting, the fossil fuel industry has been busy playing the legislative game. And in many respects they are winning. Former Exxon CEO, Rex Tillerson, now the secretary of state for the Trump administration, shows they have been able to successfully infiltrate all levels of government and advance policy that makes it easier to expand dangerous practices.

In many ways, the fossil fuel industry is only doing what we allow. Protesting is very demanding. Many movements become stalled because the primary focus is turning people out to protest, march or boycott, while overlooking the greater need for policy to support the demands of progress. It is critical that the climate movement largely pivot towards legislation and policy change, otherwise we are setting ourselves up for a whole lot of frustration and fatigue. While we're in the streets protesting we must know that there are power players who understand the policy game, how to fund it, make the rules and get ahead.

If the climate movement is to be successful we must look to examples like what is happening in Maryland where 200 health professionals, 170 local businesses and 160 groups are calling for a ban on fracking. Don't Frack Maryland has focused locally on the policy necessary to stop fracking from entering their state with Senate and House bills. This campaign has brought together the science, education and climate advocacy to demand change. We must affect policy. Now is the time to organize locally.

Demonstration without legislation leads to frustration.

The days of frustration are over!

The climate movement must be in the streets, suites and state house (in every state).

Ban fracking now!

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