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Government Agencies Defy Trump by Tweeting Climate Facts

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Government Agencies Defy Trump by Tweeting Climate Facts

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Even though Trump has previously said that he wants to keep public lands "great" and is "not looking to sell off land," that doesn't mean the leasing of public lands and waters for energy production is off the table.

The Trump Administration's Twitter takedowns are particularly concerning as it emerged today that staffers at several federal agencies dealing with scientific data and environmental policy—including the Environmental Protection Agency, Department of Agriculture, National Park Service, Department of Transportation and Health and Human Services—have reportedly received various degrees of formal instruction barring them from speaking to press or using social media.

"These actions will stem the free flow of information and have a chilling effect on staff in these agencies," Sam Adams, U.S. director of the World Resources Institute, said. "This flies in the face of effective policymaking which requires an open exchange of ideas, supported by the best science and evidence available. Curtailing communications from these agencies will hinder their ability to provide clean air and water and protect people's health across the country. The administration should lift these bans as soon as possible and ensure that the role of science is respected within our government agencies."

But in a happy twist, despite the Trump Administration's cone of silence, another plucky social media warrior from the Golden Gate National Park has tweeted out this climate change fact that "2016 was the hottest year on record for the 3rd year in a row," and included a link to a report from NASA and NOAA announcing the startling fact.

NASA also appears to be safe from Trump's social media ban for now, tweeting out this post on rising average global temperatures.

Quartz also noted that on Monday the Department of Defense tweeted about the connection of social media activity to a person's mental health. Perhaps a cheeky reference to our Twitterer-in-Chief?

And, in a delightful turn of events, there's now an "unofficial" National Park Service Twitter that has 363K followers and counting called @AltNatParkSer. The account is apparently operated by three rangers from Washington's Mount Rainier who have posted the same climate change information deleted from other park accounts.

The best thing about the account is that the Trump administration cannot do anything to stop it since it's unofficial.

It's currently unclear if the tweets come from actual National Park Service rangers, but we'll support anyone trying to defy Trump's climate censorship.

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