Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Help Support EcoWatch

Award-Winning Patagonia Film Documents Surfer's Fight to Save His Home

Last week, Patagonia announced the global release of The Fisherman’s Son, a 30-minute film chronicling Ramón Navarro’s rise to the top of the big wave surfing world and his growing voice as an environmental activist.

“I have traveled all around the world only to realize the most amazing place is my own backyard at Punta de Lobos,” said Ramón Navarro. Photo credit: Patagonia

"When one of Chile’s most iconic surf spots and Navarro’s home break of Punta de Lobos came under the threat of commercial development, Ramón, the son of a subsistence fisherman, turned his platform as a surfer into a campaign to protect a place critical to his sport and near to his heart," says Patagonia.

The film, which recently won the 5Points Award 2015 at the 5Point Film Festival in Carbondale, Colorado, was produced by Patagonia and directed by Chris Malloy in association with Save the Waves. Navarro is seeking donations to Save The Waves to help him protect Punta de Lobos forever.

“I have traveled all around the world only to realize the most amazing place is my own backyard at Punta de Lobos,” said Navarro. “I want to protect this place for the fishermen and surfers who live there now and for the generations to come. Being given the opportunity to tell the story of my community through this film has been incredible, and I’m humbled at the response from people who want to get involved themselves.”

So far, the group has been successful in holding back the tide of development around Punta de Lobos that Navarro says would destroy the unique culture of his hometown. The area was declared a World Surfing Reserve in 2014.

But the area remains under serious threat. Crowd-sourced funds generated by the campaign go directly towards the development of a conservation master plan and foundation to protect the point, protecting both the traditional fishing culture and local marine biodiversity.

Watch the full film here:

YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

How Forest Fragmentation Threatens Biodiversity

UN Scientists Call for Action on Marine Microplastics as New York Assembly Passes Microbeads Ban

Help Save One of America’s Most Pristine and Endangered Rivers from Proposed Coal Mine

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

The Firefly Watch project is among the options for aspiring citizen scientists to join. Mike Lewinski / Wikimedia Commons / CC by 2.0

By Tiffany Means

Summer and fall are great seasons to enjoy the outdoors. But if you're already spending extra time outside because of the COVID-19 pandemic, you may be out of ideas on how to make fresh-air activities feel special. Here are a few suggestions to keep both adults and children entertained and educated in the months ahead, many of which can be done from the comfort of one's home or backyard.

Read More Show Less
People sit at the bar of a restaurant in Austin, Texas, on June 26, 2020. Texas Governor Greg Abbott ordered bars to be closed by noon on June 26 and for restaurants to be reduced to 50% occupancy. Coronavirus cases in Texas spiked after being one of the first states to begin reopening. SERGIO FLORES / AFP via Getty Images

The coronavirus may linger in the air in crowded indoor spaces, spreading from one person to the next, the World Health Organization acknowledged on Thursday, as The New York Times reported. The announcement came just days after 239 scientists wrote a letter urging the WHO to consider that the novel coronavirus is lingering in indoor spaces and infecting people, as EcoWatch reported.

Read More Show Less
A never-before-documented frog species has been discovered in the Peruvian highlands and named Phrynopus remotum. Germán Chávez

By Angela Nicoletti

The eastern slopes of the Andes Mountains in central Perú are among the most remote places in the world.

Read More Show Less
Left: Lemurs in Madagascar on March 30, 2017. Mathias Appel / Flickr. Right: A North Atlantic right whale mother and calf. National Marine Fisheries Service

A new analysis by scientists at the Swiss-based International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) found that lemurs and the North Atlantic right whale are on the brink of extinction.

Read More Show Less
Nobody knows exactly how much vitamin D a person actually needs. However, vitamin D is becoming increasingly popular. Colin Dunn / Flickr / CC by 2.0

By Julia Vergin

It is undisputed that vitamin D plays a role everywhere in the body and performs important functions. A severe vitamin D deficiency, which can occur at a level of 12 nanograms per milliliter of blood or less, leads to severe and painful bone deformations known as rickets in infants and young children and osteomalacia in adults. Unfortunately, this is where the scientific consensus ends.

Read More Show Less
Data from a scientist measuring macroalgal communities in rocky shores in the Argentinean Patagonia would be added to the new system. Patricia Miloslavich / University of Delaware

Ocean scientists have been busy creating a global network to understand and measure changes in ocean life. The system will aggregate data from the oceans, climate and human activity to better inform sustainable marine management practices.

EcoWatch sat down with some of the scientists spearheading the collaboration to learn more.

Read More Show Less

Trending

Authors of a new study warned Thursday that increasing carbon dioxide in the atmosphere is nearing a level not seen in 15 million years. Dawn Ellner / Flickr / CC by 2.0

By Jessica Corbett

As a United Nations agency released new climate projections showing that the world is on track in the next five years to hit or surpass a key limit of the Paris agreement, authors of a new study warned Thursday that increasing carbon dioxide in the atmosphere is nearing a level not seen in 15 million years.

Read More Show Less