Quantcast

The Secret Usefulness of Avocado Pits

Food
Pixabay

By Dan Nosowitz

A couple of years ago, following the whole avocado toast thing, there was a trend of eating the pit (technically a seed). People would dry them out, chop or blend them into a powder, and treat them basically as a supplement, full of fiber and antioxidants. Now, research indicates that the avocado pit has some other impressive properties.


New research from Penn State found that extract from the avocado pit has significant anti-inflammatory properties. In classic scientist-undersell mode, one of the researchers said, "We saw inhibitory activity at concentrations in the low microgram-per-milliliter range, which is an acceptable amount of activity to justify further studies." In other words, yes, avocado pit extract is anti-inflammatory in a non-nonsense way.

But that doesn't mean that you should try centrifuging your own avocado pit extract. After the trend of blending up the pits, some attention was paid to whether the pit is even edible. Many other seeds, including apple seeds, are not edible, even if you can figure out their texture; apple seeds contain a substance that, in the body, creates cyanide. Not at lethal doses from one apple, sure, but, you know. Cyanide.

The research on avocado pits is far less settled than for apple seeds. The California Avocado Commission, which has every motivation to promote edible avocado pits, says that they do not recommend eating them, as the research has not yet adequately decided whether the pits are safe to eat. Other nutritionists agree.

But the Penn State research furthers the idea that there's something to the pit besides a method to keep guacamole green, or a fun planting experiment. The pits are usually garbage, and while they're highly biodegradable, there still might be a way to make use of them.

Reposted with permission from our media associate Modern Farmer.

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

Pexels

By Adda Bjarnadottir, MS, LN

Up to 20% of people may have a food addiction or exhibit addictive-like eating behavior.

Read More Show Less
Spiced hot chocolate. Lilechka75 / iStock / Getty Images

By Katey Davidson, MScFN, RD

Food is the cornerstone of the holiday season. It brings friends and family together to share memories, cultural traditions, and great flavors.

Read More Show Less
Sponsored
Solar panels at the Renewable Hydrogen Fueling and Production Station on Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam. U.S. Navy / Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Daniel Barker / Released

By Tara Lohan

Three years into the Trump administration, its anti-climate and anti-science agenda is well established. Despite dire warnings from the world's leading scientists about the threats from rising greenhouse gas emissions, the administration has stubbornly continued to deny climate change, obstructed and undermined efforts to curb it, and moved again and again to roll back existing regulations that help reduce emissions.

Read More Show Less
Pexels

By Ryan Raman, MS, RD

Rye bread tends to have a darker color and stronger, earthier taste than regular white and wheat bread, which is one reason why many people enjoy it.

Read More Show Less
Elva Etienne / Moment / Getty Images

By Ketura Persellin

Gift-giving is filled with minefields, but the Environmental Working Group's (EWG) got your back, so you don't need to worry about inadvertently giving family members presents laden with toxic chemicals. With that in mind, here are our suggestions for gifts to give your family this season.

Read More Show Less