Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Australia to Build One of World's Longest Electric Vehicle Highways

Popular

To help spur the "electric vehicle revolution," Australia will build a superhighway consisting of a network of free, fast-charging electric vehicle stations.

Much of the 1,118-mile route will stretch along the coast of the Australian state of Queensland, near the Great Barrier Reef, Reuters reported.


Environment Minister and Acting Main Roads Minister Steven Miles said the highway will be the world's longest in one state once complete and will be powered by renewable energy purchased through green energy credits or offsets.

"EVs can provide not only a reduced fuel cost for Queenslanders, but an environmentally-friendly transport option, particularly when charged from renewable energy," he said.

Miles said that 18 towns and cities will make up the first phase of the "Electric Super Highway." Once it's up an running in the next six months, EV drivers will be able to coast from the state's southern border to the Far North.

The 18 stations, which can recharge a vehicle in half an hour, will offer free power for at least one year.

"They will be available for use at no cost for the initial phase of the super highway so we can encourage as many people as possible to start using them," Miles said.

As the Guardian noted, Australia's new EV highway will be about the same length as the West Coast Green Highway, which spans from California to Oregon and Washington state. The world's longest EV highway is the massive Trans-Canada EV highway, which is about 4,850 miles in length.

"This project is ambitious, but we want as many people as possible on board the electric vehicle revolution, as part of our transition to a low emissions future," Miles said.

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

Derrick Jackson

By Derrick Z. Jackson

As much as hurricanes Katrina and Maria upended African American and Latinx families, the landfall of the coronavirus brings a gale of another order. This Category 5 of infectious disease packs the power to level communities already battered from environmental, economic, and health injustice. If response and relief efforts fail to adequately factor in existing disparities, the current pandemic threatens a knockout punch to the American Dream.

Read More Show Less
President Donald Trump speaks during a roundtable meeting with energy sector CEOs in the Cabinet Room of the White House April 3 in Washington, DC. Doug Mills-Pool / Getty Images

By Andrea Germanos

A coalition of climate organizations strongly criticized President Donald Trump's in-person Friday meeting with the chief executives of some of the biggest fossil fuel companies in the world, saying the industry that fueled climate disaster must not be allowed to profiteer from government giveaways by getting bailout funds or preferred treatment during the coronavirus pandemic.

Read More Show Less
Sponsored
Pexels

By SaVanna Shoemaker, MS, RDN, LD

An Important Note

No supplement, diet, or lifestyle modification — aside from social distancing and practicing proper hygiene ⁠— can protect you from developing COVID-19.

The strategies outlined below may boost your immune health, but they don't protect specifically against COVID-19.

Read More Show Less
Pexels

By Zak Smith

It is pretty amazing that in this moment when the COVID-19 outbreak has much of the country holed up in their homes binging Netflix, the most watched show in America over the last few weeks has been focused on wildlife trade — which scientists believe is the source of the COVID-19 pandemic. Make no mistake: Tiger King: Murder, Mayhem and Madness is about wildlife trade and other aspects of wildlife exploitation, just as surely as the appearance of Ebola, SARS, MERS, avian flu and probably COVID-19 in humans is a result of wildlife exploitation. As a conservationist, this is one of the things I've been thinking about while watching Tiger King. Here are five more:

Read More Show Less
Pexels

By Hector Chapa

With the coronavirus pandemic quickly spreading, U.S. health officials have changed their advice on face masks and now recommend people wear cloth masks in public areas where social distancing can be difficult, such as grocery stores.

But can these masks be effective?

Read More Show Less