Quantcast

Attention Jeb Bush: America's Transition to a Renewable Energy Economy Is Already Underway

Politics

During a town hall meeting on Thursday, former Governor of the Sunshine State and presidential candidate Jeb Bush acknowledged that “I do think we’re going to get to a renewable energy economy” but that we were still waiting on “the disruptive technologies” to be invented to get us there.

Bush went on say that "there’s someone in a garage somewhere … there’s someone in a dorm in a college that’s about ready to say I’m bored to tears and I’m going to go reinvent the wheel. There is someone that is preparing to disrupt the old order in energy.”

Watch the video here:

What Bush fails to recognize is the fact that Americans are already feeling the impacts of climate change and Citigroup estimates that failing to address climate change would cost the global economy as much as $44 trillion by 2060.

Fortunately, the transition to a clean energy economy is already underway—and we don’t have to wait for a man in a garage or a college student in a dorm to build our clean energy future.

Nationally, we are seeing clean energy starting to compete head-to-head with fossil fuels—and win. In the first half of 2015, renewable energy accounts for more than two-thirds of new electricity generation capacity across the U.S. In the key presidential state of Iowa, wind already supplies more than 28 percent of the state's electricity—and data shows that the state could increase to more than 40 percent in the next five years.

All across this country the clean energy revolution is already happening. The fact is the tens of thousands of people who work in wind and solar know that we don’t have to wait for clean energy technology to be invented. The American people and business are doing their part—now we need leaders like Jeb Bush to step up and embrace the solutions that we know already exist and will accelerate the transition to a clean energy economy.

Increasing renewable energy is translating to real savings for consumers. According to a recent analysis by DBL Investors, the average retail electricity price in leading renewables states is 5 percent lower than the price in the states that are furthest behind. The solar expansion has spread beyond the usual suspects, with states like North Carolina and Texas, Massachusetts, New Jersey and New York included among the 10 states with the most solar installations last year. Likewise, Midwestern states like Iowa and South Dakota are leading the nation in wind generation market share, getting more than 25 percent of their in-state energy from wind. As renewables approach cost parity with fossil fuels, and in many cases become less expensive, electric utilities are learning how to integrate more and more clean sources into regular operations. For example, in 2015 Austin Energy recorded the lowest bids ever seen for a utility solar solicitation when it received 1,200 megawatts of solar bids for less than 4 cents/kilowatt hour.

NextGen Climate is calling on Bush to acknowledge that the transition to clean energy is already underway and lay out a concrete plan to accelerate this transition and achieve more than 50 percent clean energy by 2030.

YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

Koch Brothers: Apocalyptical Forces of Ignorance and Greed, Says RFK Jr.

It’s Official: Young People Want Our Country Powered by Renewables

U.S. Generates Enough Electricity From Solar to Power 4.6 Million Homes

World’s Largest Solar Farm Will Generate Enough Electricity to Power 320,000 Households

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

Wild Exmoor ponies graze on a meadow in the Czech Republic. rapier / iStock / Getty Images Plus

By Nanticha Ocharoenchai

In the Czech Republic, horses have become the knights in shining armor. A study published in the Journal for Nature Conservation suggests that returning feral horses to grasslands in Podyjí National Park could help boost the numbers of several threatened butterfly species.

Read More Show Less

Despite huge strides in improving the lives of children since 1989, many of the world's poorest are being left behind, the United Nations children's fund UNICEF warned Monday.

Read More Show Less
Sponsored
(L) Selma Three Stone Engagement Ring. (R) The Greener Diamond Farm Project. MiaDonna

By Bailey Hopp

If you had to choose a diamond for your engagement ring from below or above the ground, which would you pick … and why would you pick it? This is the main question consumers are facing when picking out their diamond engagement ring today. With a dramatic increase in demand for conflict-free lab-grown diamonds, the diamond industry is shifting right before our eyes.

Read More Show Less
At least seven people have died in a Bangladesh pipeline explosion. Youtube screenshot

At least seven people were killed when a gas pipeline exploded in Bangladesh Sunday, and another 25 were injured, the Associated Press reported.

Read More Show Less
The Shell Puget Sound Refinery in Anacortes, Washington. John Westrock / Flickr

The Washington Department of Ecology responded to an oil spill that took place Friday night when a Crowley Maritime Barge was transferring five million gallons of oil to the Shell Puget Sound Refinery, CNN reported.

Read More Show Less
Sponsored
Pixabay

By Claire L. Jarvis

A ruckus over biofuels has been brewing in Iowa.

Read More Show Less
Serena and Venus Williams have been known to follow a vegan diet. Edwin Martinez / Flickr / CC BY 2.0

By Whitney E. Akers

  • "The Game Changers" is a new documentary on Netflix that posits a vegan diet can improve athletic performance in professional athletes.

  • Limited studies available show that the type of diet — plant-based or omnivorous — doesn't give you an athletic advantage.

  • We talked to experts about what diet is the best for athletic performance.

Packed with record-setting athletes displaying cut physiques and explosive power, "The Game Changers," a new documentary on Netflix, has a clear message: Vegan is best.

Read More Show Less
An illegally trafficked tiger skull and pelt. Ryan Moehring / USFWS

By John R. Platt

When it comes to solving problems related to wildlife trade, there are an awful lot of "sticky widgets."

Read More Show Less