Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

#AskChevron Ignored by Company as Tweets Question Oil Giant's Environmental Destruction

Energy
#AskChevron Ignored by Company as Tweets Question Oil Giant's Environmental Destruction

No, Chevron Corp. was not crazy enough to promote the hashtag, #AskChevron. The New York Police Department already showed us all why such a hashtag is never a good idea.

Still, #AskChevron was listed at the top of Twitter trending topics lists around the world Wednesday, the same day as the company's shareholders meeting. The ridicule the oil giant would experience was not self-inflicted, though—the promotion was purchased by Toxic Effect. The group's promotion invited a blend of humor, serious questions and statements about the oil and gas corporation's past blunders and overall lack of care for the planet and the people who live on it.

The hashtag coincided with Toxic Effect's protest outside of the shareholders meeting in Midland, TX and was rolled out with another hashtag, #WeThePeople. Predictably, Chevron offered no response to the questions or statements from thousands of environmental advocates and Twitter users. Here are some of the tweets we'd like Chevron to respond to:

——–

YOU ALSO MIGHT LIKE

U.S. Judge Sides With Chevron in Case Against Ecuadorians, Allows Oil Giant to Evade Justice

Jon Stewart Highlights Earthquakes, Chevron’s Pizza and Other ‘Benefits’ of Fracking

11K+ Call on Chevron to Apologize for Responding to Gas Well Explosion With Pizza Coupons

——–

Kevin Russ / Moment / Getty Images

By Kang-Chun Cheng

Modoc County lies in the far northeast corner of California, and most of its 10,000 residents rely on cattle herding, logging, or government jobs for employment. Rodeos and 4-H programs fill most families' calendars; massive belt buckles, blue jeans, and cowboy hats are common attire. Modoc's niche brand of American individualism stems from a free-spirited cowboy culture that imbues the local ranching conflict with wild horses.

Read More Show Less

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

Christian Aslund / EyeEm / Getty Images

By Anne-Sophie Brändlin

COVID-19 and climate change have been two of the most pressing issues in 2020.

Read More Show Less

Trending

Artist's impression of an Othalo community, imagined by architect Julien De Smedt. Othalo

By Victoria Masterson

Using one of the world's problems to solve another is the philosophy behind a Norwegian start-up's mission to develop affordable housing from 100% recycled plastic.

Read More Show Less
Pexels

By Brett Wilkins

Despite acknowledging that the move would lead to an increase in the 500 million to one billion birds that die each year in the United States due to human activity, the Trump administration on Friday published a proposed industry-friendly relaxation of a century-old treaty that protects more than 1,000 avian species.

Read More Show Less
U.S. returns create about 15 million metric tons of carbon dioxide emissions. manonallard / Getty Images

Many people shop online for everything from clothes to appliances. If they do not like the product, they simply return it. But there's an environmental cost to returns.

Read More Show Less