Quantcast

Asbestos-Laced Makeup: Children’s Products Continue to Be Contaminated With Deadly Fiber

Health + Wellness
Claire's Bedazzled Rainbow Heart Makeup Set is among the company's products to be recalled for asbestos testing. claires.com

The troubling news about the presence of asbestos in children's makeup is just the latest example of the deadly fiber contaminating imported products marketed toward children, said Environmental Working Group (EWG).

The national retail chain Claire's, which sells jewelry, makeup and other items targeted toward young girls and children, recently announced it was recalling a number of its makeup products after they tested positive for asbestos.


In 2015, EWG Action Fund (the 501 (c)(4) sister organization to EWG) found asbestos fibers in several brands of children's crayons and toy crime scene investigation kits.

In 2007, tests commissioned by the Asbestos Disease Awareness Organization (ADAO) also found the lethal fiber in another toy fingerprint named after the television show CSI: Crime Scene Investigation.

In 2000, an investigation by journalists with the Seattle Post Intelligencer discovered asbestos in imported crayons made with talc.

Shortly after EWG Action Fund published the results of its 2015 report, it called on the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission to investigate asbestos contamination in children's crayons and toys. EWG urged the CPSC to order toy companies to stop using talc that might be contaminated with asbestos in children's products.

"It seems every time someone looks for asbestos in imported children's products that include talc as an ingredient they find the deadly fiber," said Alex Formuzis, vice president for communications at EWG. "This should outrage both parents and federal regulators alike. There is no safe level of asbestos exposure so if a child inhales even the smallest amount it can lead to asbestos-triggered diseases, like mesothelioma, later in life."

All of the children's products where asbestos was detected were imported from China and included talc as an ingredient.

Geologically, talc and asbestos can be formed from the same parent rock. In many regions, talc deposits are contaminated with asbestos fibers.

Asbestos fibers lodged in the lungs or other organs can cause grave, often fatal, illnesses whose symptoms are not evident for decades after exposure. If children are exposed when young, there is more time for asbestos-related illness to develop later in life.

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

Yulia Lisitsa / iStock / Getty Images Plus

By Brianna Elliott, RD

Collagen is the most abundant protein in your body.

It is the major component of connective tissues that make up several body parts, including tendons, ligaments, skin, and muscles.

Read More
Greenpeace activists unfurl banners after building a wood and card 'oil pipeline' outside the Canadian High Commission, Canada House, to protest against the Trudeau government's plans to build an oil pipeline in British Colombia on April 18, 2018 in London. Chris J Ratcliffe / Getty Images

By Jessica Corbett

In an open letter to Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and Deputy Prime Minister Chrystia Freeland, 42 Nobel laureates implored the federal government to "act with the moral clarity required" to tackle the global climate crisis and stop Teck Resources' proposed Frontier tar sands mine.

Read More
Sponsored
Mapping Urban Heat through Portland State University / video

Concrete and asphalt absorb the sun's energy. So when a heat wave strikes, city neighborhoods with few trees and lots of black pavement can get hotter than other areas — a lot hotter.

Read More
Pexels

By Ryan Raman, MS, RD

Vitamin C is an essential vitamin, meaning your body can't produce it. Yet, it has many roles and has been linked to impressive health benefits.

Read More
The Rio San Antonio, in the headwaters basin of the Rio Grande in New Mexico, will lose federal protections under a new rule. Bob Wick / BLM California

By Tara Lohan

The Santa Fe River starts high in the forests of New Mexico's Sangre de Cristo mountains and flows 46 miles to the Rio Grande. Along the way it plays important roles for wildlife, irrigation, recreation and other cultural uses, and provides 40 percent of the water supply for the city of Santa Fe's 85,000 residents.

Read More