Quantcast
Popular
Melwater, Greenland ice sheet. Diane Tuft

5 Incredible Artists Taking on the Climate Crisis

Artists are taking the climate crisis into frame and the results are emotional, beautiful and stirring.

So you've seen the best climate change cartoons and shared them with your friends. You've showed your family the infographics on climate change and health, infographics on how the grid works and infographics about clean, renewable energy. You've even forwarded these official National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration graphs that explain the 10 clear indicators of climate change to your colleagues at the office.


But sometimes, you need more than just the facts and data to really bring home the reality of the climate crisis. You need to make an emotional connection—and what better way to do it than through the power of art?

Read on for five outstanding examples of art that reaches beyond facts and figures to capture the crisis in ways numbers alone can't touch:

1. Jill Pelto's Glaciogenic Art

Scientist and artist Jill Pelto was inspired by charts and data to create unique new artwork that adds an element of emotion that can be lacking in scientific circles.

"As a scientist I make and read a lot of graphs, yet I forgot that many people do not," Pelto told Creators. "Using actual information ... provided an intellectual context to my work while my illustrations around the graphs created an emotional story that can inspire people to promote environmental justice ... My hope is that my artwork can share this message of change yet also ignite a passion to help prevent further environmental damage."

2. Diane Tuft's the Arctic Melt

We're sadly getting used to hearing news about sea ice nearing record lows at both poles. For most people, however, the Arctic is a place they will never see in person. After years documenting the impacts of climate crisis, photographer Diane Tuft journeyed to the north to show how the Arctic is both beautiful and changing. The result: her new book, The Arctic Melt: Images of a Disappearing Landscape,

"By sharing these images, I hope to provoke discussion on the fragile environment that we are experiencing and stimulate dialogue on how to preserve the beauty of our planet," she wrote.

3. Lorenzo Quinn's Support

"I have three children, and I'm thinking about their generation and what world we're going to pass on to them. I'm worried, I'm very worried."

Artist Lorenzo Quinn created Support for the 57th International Art Exhibition of the La Biennale di Venezia. Venice, for all its canals and rich history, is highly susceptible to sea level rise, with the famed Piazza San Marco experiencing acqua alta—high water—up to 60 times per year.

Regarding his work, Quinn said that he "wants to speak to the people in a clear, simple and direct way through the innocent hands of a child and it evokes a powerful message, which is that united we can make a stand to curb the climate change that affects us all."

4. Murray Fredricks' Vanity

Call it the anti-selfie. Now on display as part of Australia's ART+CLIMATE=CHANGE 2017 festival—an exhibition centered on climate change art—Australian photographer Murray Fredricks placed mirrors in the Lake Eyre salt flats. But rather than reflecting himself or any humans, they point outwards, to the fragile and beautiful environment being altered by climate change. The results are stunning.

5. Brian Foo's Climate Change Coloring Book

Feeling inspired and want to express your passion for climate change through art? Artists of any skill level can enjoy this adult coloring book featuring climate data.

Brian Foo, the designer, told Fast Company, "the hope is that if you spent 30 minutes or an hour actively coloring data related to climate change, the information would be more likely to stick and you'd have time to reflect on the underlying issue."

Stand With Reality

Alternative facts won't halt rising global temperatures. Fake news won't make polluted air safe to breathe. And burning more fossil fuels sure won't protect our planet.

But clean energy and science will.

With renewable technologies like wind and solar in our hands today, we can solve the climate crisis. But only if our leaders insist on truth, accept reality and listen to science.

Together, we'll make them. Add your name now to Stand With Reality.

Show Comments ()
Sponsored
Pexels

Forest Gardening With Space for Wild Elephants

By Michael B. Commons

In my collaboration with Terra Genesis International, I have been given space and support to investigate what we may call "Regenerative Pathways," looking at real life examples of functional farming systems that we can identify as being on the "Regenerative Agriculture Pathway."

While these farms/farming systems might be called "Regenerative Farms," we see regeneration more as a long term process and continuum that we can evaluate through indicators such as soil health, water retention, biodiversity, community health and more.

Keep reading... Show less
Slava Bowman / Unsplash

How Can We Help Put a Human Face on Climate Change?

By John R. Platt

Communicating the truths about climate change isn't always easy. Sometimes the effects of climate change seem to hover in the future, or are occurring most visibly in other parts of the world. Other times they're subtle—at least for now. And of course, there are some people who just don't want to hear anything about it.

Keep reading... Show less
Popular
Aerial view of Yaguas River and the Cachimbo tributary. Alvaro del Campo, Field Museum

Peru's Newest National Park Safeguards 2 Million Acres of Amazon Rainforest

The Peruvian government announced it will establish a new and enormous national park in the Amazon.

Yaguas National Park, located in the northern region of Loreto, consists of 2,147,166 acres of rainforest, a vast river system and is home to more than 3,000 species of plants, 500 species of birds and 160 species of mammals, including giant otters, woolly monkeys, Amazonian river dolphins and manatees. The park also features 550 fish species—one of the richest fish faunas in the world.

Keep reading... Show less
Molteno Dam Reservoir in Cape Town. Wikimedia Commons

Will Cape Town Become the First Major City to Run Out of Water?

Cape Town is on track to become the first major city in the world to run out of water.

The world-renowned tourist destination—and the second-most populous urban area in South Africa after Johannesburg—could approach "Day Zero," when most taps run dry, by April 21, Mayor Patricia de Lille said Tuesday.

Keep reading... Show less
Sponsored
Adventure
The mountains of Haiti. PO2 Daniel Barker / DVIDS

Haiti’s Most Popular Ecotourism Destinations

The tropical Caribbean island of Haiti is a paradise with a rich, fascinating history, natural wonders and diverse cultural offerings. It has also been named by some as the next big thing in regional tourism.

But ecotourism in particular could become important for Haiti, with its rich land and sea biodiversity. Globally, the business of ecotourism generates more than $600 billion a year and is connected to hundreds of thousands of jobs.

Keep reading... Show less
Politics
iStock

Nearly All Coastal Governors Denounce Plan to Expand Offshore Oil Drilling

Politicians from coastal states around the country continue to call for their states to be exempt from the Trump administration's proposed expansion of offshore drilling following its politically-tinged decision last week to remove Florida from the plan.

The Interior Department said last week that Secretary Ryan Zinke had spoken with seven coastal governors opposed to drilling, including the governors of North and South Carolina, Rhode Island, Delaware and Washington. Oregon Gov. Kate Brown's office told press Zinke would consider removing the state from the plan following their call, while California Gov. Jerry Brown's office reports that Zinke promised to travel to the state to further discuss the offshore leases.

Keep reading... Show less
Sponsored
Health
Rob Hainer / IStock

In Alabama, a Cleanup Unearths Toxins—and Scandal

By Matt Smith

Lot by lot, backhoes and dump trucks are scraping and hauling away yards on the north side of Birmingham to remove soil laced with heavy metals and other industrial wastes—the legacy of this city's years as a steelmaking power.

Federal prosecutors say that effort also uncovered something else: a scheme to save polluters millions by putting the neighborhood's representative in Montgomery on their payroll.

Keep reading... Show less
Brian Wanamaker / Flickr

Two Major Food Companies Announce War on Packaging Waste

More and more businesses are stepping up to reduce consumer waste. Iceland Foods, a major UK supermarket chain specializing in frozen food, announced on Tuesday that it will eliminate plastic packaging from its own brand of products by the end of 2023.

In a separate announcement on Tuesday, McDonald's said it will add recycling to its more than 36,000 locations around the world by 2025 and pledges that all packaging on customer products will come from "renewable, recycled or certified sources" by that same year.

Keep reading... Show less
Sponsored

mail-copy

The best of EcoWatch, right in your inbox. Sign up for our email newsletter!