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Arkansas State Univeristy-Newport's Renewable Energy Program Soars

Energy

EcoWatch

Arkansas State University-Newport’s (ASUN) campus is located in the heart of the agricultural sector of Northeast Arkansas. ASUN’s Renewable Energy program offers several choices, from individual courses of your choice to a fast-track path toward a Bachelor of Applied Science from Arkansas State University. Along the way you can earn a Certificate of Proficiency, a Technical Certificate or an Associate of Applied Science in Renewable Energy Technology.

Some of the courses you can expect to take include Introduction to Renewable Energy Technology, Biofuels, Process Instrumentation and Industrial Safety. In the Introduction to Renewable Energy Technology course, students learn about renewable energy technologies such as wind, solar, geothermal, hydropower and biomass. In Biofuels, students learn to convert biomass resources into fuels such as methane, ethanol and biodiesel. More advanced courses include Biomass and Feedstocks, Bioprocess Practices and an industry related Internship completed by each student.

Renewable Energy Technology students are also introduced to applied research in many different areas. Currently, students are active in research concerning hydropower, energy crop production, biofuels, and solar power. This research experience prepares graduates for entry into the workforce in the rapidly emerging field of alternative energy. Upon graduation, students have many career options. Dependent upon their interest, they can enter the field as operators, analysts or technicians.

As Arkansas State University-Newport’s program continues to develop, we strive to work toward solutions to the energy crisis. Join us as we prepare this new age workforce—the workforce of the future.

For more information call Jack Osier at 870-512-7843 or click here.

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