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Arise Music Festival: Uplifting the World Through Music and Action

Health + Wellness

The 2nd Annual ARISE Music Festival kicks off Aug. 8 - Aug. 10. The 3-day festival will feature a selection of yoga and movement intensives each day, a mini documentary film festival, special guest presenters and activists, diverse interactive workshops, delicious food, local brews and fine craft vendors specializing in organic and natural products of all kinds.


The stellar music lineup includes Beats Antique, Galactic with special guests Chali2na and Lyrics Born, Grateful Grass featuring Keller Williams, Billy Nershi (String Cheese Incicent) and Reed Mathis, The Infamous Stringdusters, The Polish Ambassador, Groundation, Tribal Seeds, Nahko and Medicine for the People, The Everyone Orchestra featuring Steve Kimock and the return of Quixotic, among many other favorite performers.

“The music is like the fire… and we all gather around it to warm our souls" says Paul Bassis, producer of ARISE. “The intention of the festival is to facilitate and amplify that inspiration into real life action."

With a focus on conscious performers and diverse daily activities, participants and attendees from the 2013 event raved about the quality and range of options along with the thoughtful intention behind last year's event, touting the festival as Colorado's best of 2013.

Independent documentary films—DamNation, GMOOMG and Dear Governor Hickenlooper—will be featured in the 400 seat domed theater.

The ARISE Festival will take place just an hour from downtown Denver, in a majestic valley outside of Loveland, CO. Located on 100 acres of the picturesque Sunrise Ranch and surrounded by an unrivaled red rock landscape. The annual festival has the potential to grow into a full-scale national event in years to come as the good word naturally spreads about one of the most beautiful and accessible music and camping festivals anywhere in the centennial state.

A special event for all ages, the ARISE Music Festival also caters to families with daily kid-friendly activities and programming culminating in a kid's parade on Saturday evening.

Tickets are on sale now. For more information visit the ARISE Festival website or the festival's Facebook and Twitter page.

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