Quantcast

Are You Ready to Try an Oreo Cricket Milkshake?

Food

Eating insects has gotten a lot of attention in the U.S. lately. Bugs have been hailed as a climate-friendly superfood that can feed our crowded planet. Last month, Dr. Jenny Josephs gave a TEDx Talk in which she explained why eating bugs will soon become the new normal around the world. (She notes that 2 billion people already eat insects as part of their diet).

In her talk, Josephs discusses how dozens of companies in Europe and the U.S. are marketing their bug-filled products. One of those companies is Wayback Burgers. For the last few months, the nation-wide fast-food chain has been popping up again and again. It started as an April Fool's joke. The company was going to put out a fake press release about insect-filled milkshakes, but people were so excited to try them that the company decided to actually make the bug-laced shakes. They did a trial run at a Long Island location, and it was so popular that on July 1 they rolled out their Oreo Mud Pie Cricket Protein Milkshake.

The company uses an organic cricket protein powder, which can be added to any of the company's shakes if Oreo mud pie is not your thing. According to the company's website, the shake is "made with hand-dipped vanilla bean ice cream, Oreo Cookie Crumbles, Peruvian Chocolate Cricket Protein powder, and chocolate and coffee flavors blended to deliver 24 grams of protein."

Sounds pretty tasty to me. Maybe some of you aren't sold, though. "There won't be big pieces of cricket floating in your shake or anything," Gillian Maffeo, director of marketing for Wayback Burgers, told ABC News. "We use a protein powder that looks very similar to whey powder. So it's ground up cricket and you wouldn't even know the difference if you were drinking it, quite honestly."

Looks like eating bugs is really making some headway in the U.S: "Initially, we thought that we'd get a lot of backlash but the trend right now is that bugs are making their way into foods," Maffeo said, noting the appearance of burgers, energy bars, flours and other recent products to the market. "It's definitely a hot commodity."

Still not convinced? Buzzfeed enlisted some people to try out the new shake.

Watch their reactions here:

YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

Why Eating Bugs Will Soon Become the New Normal

7 Nutrients You Can’t Get From Plant-Based Foods

8 Vegetables You Should Eat Raw

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

New pine trees grow from the forest floor along the North Fork of the Flathead River on the western boundary of Glacier National Park on Sept. 16, 2019 near West Glacier, Montana. Chip Somodevilla / Getty Images

By Alex Kirby

New forests are an apparently promising way to tackle global heating: the trees absorb carbon dioxide, the main greenhouse gas from human activities. But there's a snag, because permanently lower river flows can be an unintended consequence.

Read More
Household actions lead to changes in collective behavior and are an essential part of social movements. Pixabay / Pexels

By Greg McDermid, Joule A Bergerson, Sheri Madigan

Hidden among all of the troubling environmental headlines from 2019 — and let's face it, there were plenty — was one encouraging sign: the world is waking up to the reality of climate change.

So now what?

Read More
Sponsored
Logging state in the U.S. is seen representing some of the consequences humans will face in the absence of concrete action to stop deforestation, pollution and the climate crisis. Mark Newman / Lonely Planet Images / Getty Images

Talk is cheap, says the acting executive secretary of the United Nations Convention on Biological Diversity, who begged governments around the world to make sure that 2020 is not another year of conferences and empty promises, but instead is the year to take decisive action to stop the mass extinction of wildlife and the destruction of habitat-sustaining ecosystems, as The Guardian reported.

Read More
The people of Kiribati have been under pressure to relocate due to sea level rise. A young woman wades through the salty sea water that flooded her way home on Sept. 29, 2015. Jonas Gratzer / LightRocket via Getty Images

Refugees fleeing the impending effects of the climate crisis cannot be forced to return home, according to a new decision by the United Nations Human Rights Committee, as CNN reported. The new decision could open up a massive wave of legal claims by displaced people around the world.

Read More
The first day of the Strike WEF march on Davos on Jan. 18, 2020 near Davos, Switzerland. The activists want climate justice and think the WEF is for the world's richest and political elite only. Kristian Buus / In Pictures via Getty Images

By Ashutosh Pandey

Teenage climate activist Greta Thunberg is returning to the Swiss ski resort of Davos for the 2020 World Economic Forum with a strong and clear message: put an end to the fossil fuel "madness."

Read More