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Are You Deficient in Magnesium?

Food

Magnesium is the partner mineral to calcium. Typically wherever calcium is needed in the body, magnesium is also required. Magnesium is nature’s relaxation and anti-stress mineral, since it plays an important role in helping our bodies combat stress. It is necessary for healthy artery, blood, bone, heart, muscle and nerve function, yet by some estimates, show up to 80 percent of Americans are not getting enough magnesium and may be deficient. Other research shows only about 25 percent of U.S. adults are getting the recommended daily amount of 310 to 320 milligrams (mg) for women and 400 to 420 for men.

Magnesium is found in almonds, sesame seeds, sunflower seeds, figs, lemons, apples, dark leafy greens, celery, alfalfa sprouts, brown rice and many other foods.

Magnesium is vitally important to our health and well-being. It is involved in the production of energy for most of our bodily processes and even the structuring of our basic genetic material is dependent on adequate amounts of magnesium. Your body also requires adequate supplies of magnesium to manufacture the approximately 500 enzymes needed for basic life and metabolic functions.

Food Sources of Magnesium

Magnesium is found in almonds, sesame seeds, sunflower seeds, figs, lemons, apples, dark leafy greens, celery, alfalfa sprouts, brown rice and many other foods.

Symptoms of a Magnesium Deficiency

  • Back pain
  • Carpal tunnel syndrome
  • Chronic fatigue
  • Confusion
  • Cravings for chocolate
  • Depression
  • Dizziness
  • Epilepsy or convulsions
  • Excessive body odor
  • Heart palpitations or irregular heartbeat
  • High blood pressure
  • Hyperactive or restlessness
  • Inability to control bladder
  • Insomnia
  • Irritability or anxiety
  • Muscle cramps or muscle tension
  • Nervous tics or twitches or muscles that twitch or spasm
  • Pain in knees or hips
  • Painful and cold feet or hands
  • Restless legs, especially at night
  • Seizures, convulsions or tremors
  • Sensitive or loose teeth
  • Women: PMS or painful periods

Of course, many symptoms overlap with other conditions so just because you have the symptoms above doesn’t necessarily mean you are deficient in magnesium. If you have any health conditions, you should consult a qualified physician. If you suspect a magnesium deficiency, consult a qualified nutritionist for testing.

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