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Are You Buying Products from Companies that Destroy Rainforest?

Are You Buying Products from Companies that Destroy Rainforest?

Greenpeace

Walk into major U.S. retail stores and you may find a secret hiding on the shelves—rainforest destruction.

It could be there in plain sight, but Asia Pulp & Paper (APP) hopes you’ll never notice. The company—which is responsible for driving massive rainforest destruction in Indonesia—has begun stocking the shelves of U.S. stores with their own line of toilet paper and tissue products marketed under the brand name Paseo.

But these products aren’t like the others. Paseo products have no recycled content—they’re made of 100 percent virgin tree fiber. Worse, those trees come from pulpwood plantations that are eating into Indonesia’s rainforests and destroying the last Sumatran tiger habitat.

They’re wiping away rainforests for throw-away tissue.

APP has shown no signs of stopping. They’ll only change if they learn that rainforest destruction is bad for business. That's why Walmart, Kmart and other major retailers need to say no to selling Paseo tissue products until APP cleans up its act.

If 40,000 people speak out in the next 72 hours, we can really get their attention. Take action and tell major U.S. retailers like Walmart and Kmart to not sell rainforest destruction, which means not selling Paseo tissue products.

APP says its Paseo products are fully sustainable and made in the U.S. But their packaging and advertising doesn't tell you that Paseo tissue products are made from wood fiber shipped from overseas, linked to widespread rainforest destruction.

We need to put a stop to it, and fast.

With your help, we know it’s possible. Just last week, we announced that Mattel, the world’s largest toymaker, had agreed to drop business with forest destroyers like APP. Many other companies have done the same. Why? Because companies have heard from people like you that they can’t afford to look the other way when it comes to rainforest destruction.

Send a message right now to these retailers urging them to avoid business with notorious rainforest destroyer APP.

Asia Pulp & Paper needs the U.S. market to expand their business. So far they have shown no signs of stopping their destructive ways. But together we can change that.

For more information, click here.

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