Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Are We on the Verge of a Solar Revolution?

Business
Are We on the Verge of a Solar Revolution?

The recent explosion in solar is well documented. The price of solar cells have fallen 99% since the 1970s energy crisis, 100% new U.S. power capacity came from renewable sources in November, California added as much solar in 2013 as it did in the prior 30 years, India’s largest coal company now powers its headquarters with solar, Germany twice powered over 50% of its peak electricity demand with wind and solar, the list goes on.

And yet while many parts of the world are rapidly transitioning to 100% clean energy, 25% of people worldwide lack access to electricity. As solar continues its exponential growth (after all, solar cells are built from the same fundamental technology—semiconductors—that are behind the fabled Moore’s Law), we can bring not only electricity, but 100% clean energy to the billions of people currently without it.

The question is how are we going to finance and facilitate this? The answer is simple—you and your mobile phone.

Did you know more people in the world have cell phones than access to electricity? Or that 25% of Kenya’s Gross National Product flows through mobile phones? Imagine individuals in Brazil, families in India, and communities in Southeast Asia making monthly payments for 100% clean, reliable electricity on their mobile phones. And imagine those payments flowing directly back to you—the lender, whereby you can reinvest your proceeds into another solar project on your mobile phone.

At Mosaic, we believe that the fastest way to transition to a 100% clean energy economy is to allow more people to participate in that transition and benefit from it.

And that’s what our recent $1M award from Verizon’s Powerful Answers award will enable us to do … check out the video below.

Ningaloo Reef near Exmouth on April 2, 2012 in Western Australia. James D. Morgan / Getty Images News

By Dana M Bergstrom, Euan Ritchie, Lesley Hughes and Michael Depledge

In 1992, 1,700 scientists warned that human beings and the natural world were "on a collision course." Seventeen years later, scientists described planetary boundaries within which humans and other life could have a "safe space to operate." These are environmental thresholds, such as the amount of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere and changes in land use.

Read More Show Less

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

A 3-hour special film by EarthxTV calls for protection of the Amazon and its indigenous populations. EarthxTV.org

To save the planet, we must save the Amazon rainforest. To save the rainforest, we must save its indigenous peoples. And to do that, we must demarcate their land.

Read More Show Less

Trending

UN Secretary General Antonio Guterres delivers a video speech at the high-level meeting of the 46th session of the United Nations Human Rights Council UNHRC in Geneva, Switzerland on Feb. 22, 2021. Xinhua / Zhang Cheng via Getty Images

By Anke Rasper

"Today's interim report from the UNFCCC is a red alert for our planet," said UN Secretary General Antonio Guterres.

The report, released Friday, looks at the national climate efforts of 75 states that have already submitted their updated "nationally determined contributions," or NDCs. The countries included in the report are responsible for about 30% of the world's global greenhouse gas emissions.

Read More Show Less
New Delhi's smog is particularly thick, increasing the risk of vehicle accidents. SAJJAD HUSSAIN / AFP via Getty Images

India's New Delhi has been called the "world air pollution capital" for its high concentrations of particulate matter that make it harder for its residents to breathe and see. But one thing has puzzled scientists, according to The Guardian. Why does New Delhi see more blinding smogs than other polluted Asian cities, such as Beijing?

Read More Show Less
A bridge over the Delaware river connects New Hope, Pennsylvania with Lambertville, New Jersey. Richard T. Nowitz / Getty Images

In a historic move, the Delaware River Basin Commission (DRBC) voted Thursday to ban hydraulic fracking in the region. The ban was supported by all four basin states — New Jersey, Delaware, Pennsylvania and New York — putting a permanent end to hydraulic fracking for natural gas along the 13,539-square-mile basin, The Philadelphia Inquirer reported.

Read More Show Less