Quantcast

Are Eggs Dairy Free?

Health + Wellness
iStock

By Adda Bjarnadottir

For some reason, eggs and dairy are often grouped together.

Therefore, many people speculate about whether they're a dairy product.

For those who are lactose intolerant or allergic to milk proteins, it's an important distinction to make.

This article answers the question whether eggs are a dairy product.

Eggs Are Not a Dairy Product

Eggs are not a dairy product. It's as simple as that.

The definition of dairy includes foods produced from the milk of mammals, such as cows and goats (1).

Basically, it refers to milk and any food products made from milk, such as cheese, cream, butter and yogurt.

On the contrary, eggs are laid by birds, such as hens, ducks and quail. Birds are not mammals and do not even produce milk.

While eggs may be stored in the dairy aisle and often grouped with dairy, they are not a dairy product.

Bottom Line: Eggs are not a dairy product. Unlike dairy, they are not produced from the milk of mammals.

Why Eggs Are Often Categorized With Dairy

Interestingly, it's common for people to group eggs and dairy together.

Although, given that they are not related, it is rather strange.

Nevertheless, they do have two things in common:

  1. They are animal byproducts
  2. They are high in protein

Vegans and some vegetarians avoid them, as they're both derived from animals. That could be one thing adding to the confusion.

Furthermore, in the U.S. and many other countries, eggs are stored in the dairy aisle of grocery stores, which could lead people to believe they're related.

However, this simply has to do with the need to refrigerate eggs, similar to the need to refrigerate dairy products (2).

Bottom Line: Eggs and dairy products are often grouped together. They are both animal byproducts, but they are not related.

You Can Eat Eggs If You're Lactose Intolerant

If you're lactose intolerant, it is perfectly safe to eat eggs.

Lactose intolerance is a digestive condition in which the body cannot digest lactose, the main sugar found in milk and dairy products.

In fact, it is estimated that about 75 percent of adults worldwide cannot digest lactose (3).

Those who have the condition develop digestive symptoms after eating lactose, such as gas, stomach cramps and diarrhea (3).

However, eggs are not a dairy product and don't contain lactose or any milk protein, for that matter.

Therefore, similarly to how eating dairy won't affect those with an egg allergy, eating eggs will not affect those with a milk allergy or lactose intolerance—unless you're allergic to both, that is.

So there's no reason to avoid eggs if you're lactose intolerant or allergic to milk proteins.

Bottom Line: Since eggs are not a dairy product, they don't contain lactose. Therefore, those who are lactose intolerant or allergic to milk proteins can eat eggs.

Eggs Are Extremely Nutritious And Healthy

Eggs are one of the most nutritious foods you can eat (4).

Despite being relatively low in calories, eggs contain high amounts of good-quality protein, fat and a variety of nutrients.

One large egg contains the following (5):

  • Calories: 78
  • Protein: 6 grams
  • Fat: 5 grams
  • Carbs: 1 gram
  • Selenium: 22 percent of the RDI
  • Riboflavin: 15 percent of the RDI
  • Vitamin B12: 9 percent of the RDI

Eggs also contain smaller amounts of almost every vitamin and mineral that your body needs.

What's more, they are among very few dietary sources of choline, a very important nutrient that most people are not getting enough of (6).

In addition to being very nutritious, they are very filling and have been shown to be a great weight loss food (7, 8).

In fact, studies have shown that the simple act of eating eggs for breakfast can cause people to eat up to 500 fewer calories over the course of the day (8, 9).

Bottom Line: Eggs are low in calories, but they're very nutritious. They're also very filling and may help with weight loss.

Take Home Message

Despite the widespread misunderstanding, eggs are not a dairy product.

Reposted with permission from our media associate Authority Nutrition.

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

Malaysian Environment Minister Yeo Bee Yin (front 2nd L) and officials inspect a container containing plastic waste shipment on Jan. 20, 2020 before sending back to the countries of origin. AFP via Getty Images

The Southeast Asian country Malaysia has sent 150 shipping containers packed with plastic waste back to 13 wealthy countries, putting the world on notice that it will not be the world's garbage dump, as CNN reported. The countries receiving their trash back include the United States, the United Kingdom, France and Canada.

Read More
Trump leaves after delivering a speech at the Congress Centre during the World Economic Forum annual meeting in Davos on Jan. 21, 2020. JIM WATSON / AFP via Getty Images

U.S. President Donald Trump dismissed the concerns of environmental activists as "pessimism" in a speech to political and business leaders at the start of the World Economic Forum (WEF) in Davos on Tuesday.

Read More
Sponsored

Warning: The video above may be upsetting to viewers.

An amusement park in China came under fire on social media this weekend for forcing a pig off a 230 foot-high bungee tower.

Read More
Participants at the tree-planting event in Ankazobe district, Madagascar, on Jan. 19. Valisoa Rasolofomboahangy / Mongabay

By Malavika Vyawahare, Valisoa Rasolofomboahangy

Madagascar has embarked on its most ambitious tree-planting drive yet, aiming to plant 60 million trees in the coming months. The island nation celebrates 60 years of independence this year, and the start of the planting campaign on Jan. 19 marked one year since the inauguration of President Andry Rajoelina, who has promised to restore Madagascar's lost forests.

Read More
A pedestrian wearing a mask walks in a residential area in Beijing on Jan. 21, 2020. The number of people in China infected by a new SARS-like virus jumped to 291, according to authorities. WANG ZHAO / AFP via Getty Images

A new coronavirus that began sickening people in China late in 2019 can be transmitted from human to human, the country's health ministry announced Monday.

Read More