Quantcast

Are Eggs Dairy Free?

Health + Wellness
iStock

By Adda Bjarnadottir

For some reason, eggs and dairy are often grouped together.

Therefore, many people speculate about whether they're a dairy product.

For those who are lactose intolerant or allergic to milk proteins, it's an important distinction to make.

This article answers the question whether eggs are a dairy product.

Eggs Are Not a Dairy Product

Eggs are not a dairy product. It's as simple as that.

The definition of dairy includes foods produced from the milk of mammals, such as cows and goats (1).

Basically, it refers to milk and any food products made from milk, such as cheese, cream, butter and yogurt.

On the contrary, eggs are laid by birds, such as hens, ducks and quail. Birds are not mammals and do not even produce milk.

While eggs may be stored in the dairy aisle and often grouped with dairy, they are not a dairy product.

Bottom Line: Eggs are not a dairy product. Unlike dairy, they are not produced from the milk of mammals.

Why Eggs Are Often Categorized With Dairy

Interestingly, it's common for people to group eggs and dairy together.

Although, given that they are not related, it is rather strange.

Nevertheless, they do have two things in common:

  1. They are animal byproducts
  2. They are high in protein

Vegans and some vegetarians avoid them, as they're both derived from animals. That could be one thing adding to the confusion.

Furthermore, in the U.S. and many other countries, eggs are stored in the dairy aisle of grocery stores, which could lead people to believe they're related.

However, this simply has to do with the need to refrigerate eggs, similar to the need to refrigerate dairy products (2).

Bottom Line: Eggs and dairy products are often grouped together. They are both animal byproducts, but they are not related.

You Can Eat Eggs If You're Lactose Intolerant

If you're lactose intolerant, it is perfectly safe to eat eggs.

Lactose intolerance is a digestive condition in which the body cannot digest lactose, the main sugar found in milk and dairy products.

In fact, it is estimated that about 75 percent of adults worldwide cannot digest lactose (3).

Those who have the condition develop digestive symptoms after eating lactose, such as gas, stomach cramps and diarrhea (3).

However, eggs are not a dairy product and don't contain lactose or any milk protein, for that matter.

Therefore, similarly to how eating dairy won't affect those with an egg allergy, eating eggs will not affect those with a milk allergy or lactose intolerance—unless you're allergic to both, that is.

So there's no reason to avoid eggs if you're lactose intolerant or allergic to milk proteins.

Bottom Line: Since eggs are not a dairy product, they don't contain lactose. Therefore, those who are lactose intolerant or allergic to milk proteins can eat eggs.

Eggs Are Extremely Nutritious And Healthy

Eggs are one of the most nutritious foods you can eat (4).

Despite being relatively low in calories, eggs contain high amounts of good-quality protein, fat and a variety of nutrients.

One large egg contains the following (5):

  • Calories: 78
  • Protein: 6 grams
  • Fat: 5 grams
  • Carbs: 1 gram
  • Selenium: 22 percent of the RDI
  • Riboflavin: 15 percent of the RDI
  • Vitamin B12: 9 percent of the RDI

Eggs also contain smaller amounts of almost every vitamin and mineral that your body needs.

What's more, they are among very few dietary sources of choline, a very important nutrient that most people are not getting enough of (6).

In addition to being very nutritious, they are very filling and have been shown to be a great weight loss food (7, 8).

In fact, studies have shown that the simple act of eating eggs for breakfast can cause people to eat up to 500 fewer calories over the course of the day (8, 9).

Bottom Line: Eggs are low in calories, but they're very nutritious. They're also very filling and may help with weight loss.

Take Home Message

Despite the widespread misunderstanding, eggs are not a dairy product.

Reposted with permission from our media associate Authority Nutrition.

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

skaman306 / Moment / Getty Images

By Jillian Kubala, MS, RD

Radish (Raphanus sativus) is a cruciferous vegetable that originated in Asia and Europe (1Trusted Source).

Read More Show Less
Tinnakorn Jorruang / iStock / Getty Images

By Dan Nosowitz

The budding research on cannabidiol, or CBD, attracts a great deal of interest in the agricultural field.

Read More Show Less
Sponsored
Oksana Khodakovskaia / iStock / Getty Images

By Jillian Kubala, MS, RD

The loquat (Eriobotrya japonica) is a tree native to China that's prized for its sweet, citrus-like fruit.

Read More Show Less

The Centers for Disease Control (CDC) released new numbers that show vaping-related lung illnesses are continuing to grow across the country, as the number of fatalities has climbed to 33 and hospitalizations have reached 1,479 cases, according to a CDC update.

Read More Show Less
During the summer, the Arctic tundra is usually a thriving habitat for mammals such as the Arctic fox. Education Images / Universal Images Group via Getty Images

Reports of extreme snowfall in the Arctic might seem encouraging, given that the region is rapidly warming due to human-driven climate change. According to a new study, however, the snow could actually pose a major threat to the normal reproductive cycles of Arctic wildlife.

Read More Show Less
Sponsored
Vegan rice and garbanzo beans meals. Ella Olsson / Pexels

By Alina Petre, MS, RD (CA)

One common concern about vegan diets is whether they provide your body with all the vitamins and minerals it needs.

Many claim that a whole-food, plant-based diet easily meets all the daily nutrient requirements.

Read More Show Less
A fracking well looms over a residential area of Liberty, Colorado on Aug. 19. WildEarth Guardians / Flickr

A new multiyear study found that people living or working within 2,000 feet, or nearly half a mile, of a hydraulic fracturing (fracking) drill site may be at a heightened risk of exposure to benzene and other toxic chemicals, according to research released Thursday by the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment (CDPHE)

Read More Show Less
Pope Francis flanked by representatives of the Amazon Rainforest's ethnic groups and catholic prelates march in procession during the opening of the Special Assembly of the Synod of Bishops for the Pan-Amazon Region at The Vatican on Oct. 07 in Vatican City, Vatican. Alessandra Benedetti / Corbis News / Getty Images

By Vincent J. Miller

The Catholic Church "hears the cry" of the Amazon and its peoples. That's the message Pope Francis hopes to send at the Synod of the Amazon, a three-week meeting at the Vatican that ends Oct. 27.

Read More Show Less