Quantcast

Arctic Reality: If We Want to Limit Global Warming We Cannot Drill for Oil in the Chukchi Sea

Energy

Last week, President Obama made the most extensive presidential visit to Alaska ever. He hiked on a glacier, met with Native Alaskans and became the first president ever to visit the Arctic Circle. Throughout, he was calling attention to the real, on-the-ground effects of climate change. That makes sense given that Alaska is being affected by global warming more dramatically and more swiftly than any other state.

Alaska has already warmed 3.1 degrees Fahrenheit in the last 60 years according to the U.S. National Climate Assessment. This year alone, wildfires in the state have burned more than 5 million acres. Ironically, this is happening in a state that is uniquely dependent on the oil and gas industries. Yet allowing those industries to extract all of Alaska's considerable fossil fuel reserves would not only destroy much of its incredible wilderness but also lead to even worse climate disruption—not just for Alaska, but for the world:

"Our results suggest that, globally, a third of oil reserves, half of gas reserves and over 80% of current coal reserves should remain unused from 2010 to 2050 in order to meet the target of 2 degrees Celsius," Paul Ekins and Christophe McGlade wrote in the journal Nature earlier this year. "We show that development of resources in the Arctic and any increase in unconventional oil production are incommensurate with efforts to limit average global warming to 2 degrees Celsius." [3.6 degrees Fahrenheit]

It's that simple: If we want to limit global warming then we cannot continue developing new fossil fuel resources in the Arctic. That reality is what President Obama and his administration ignored by allowing Shell Oil to proceed with drilling in the Chukchi Sea this summer. They also ignored the reality that a spill in Arctic seas would be an unprecedented environmental disaster. Or, perhaps it's fairer to say that they decided it was a risk they were willing to take. On that point, we can only hope they get lucky—although if Shell continues drilling, the administration's own calculations show that the odds are not in their favor, with a 75 percent chance of a major spill.

As Rebecca Solnit poignantly wrote in The Guardian, "There is an ugly irony about extracting oil from one of the places already threatened by the effects of burning fossil fuel—where the summer ice is much reduced and temperatures are shooting up: you make the place complicit in its own destruction."

President Obama said it himself almost a year ago: "We are the first generation to feel the effect of climate change and the last generation who can do something about it." President Obama has stepped up in many ways—with the Clean Power Plan, with stronger fuel-economy measures, and other initiatives. Those are all good but, in this case, good isn't good enough. Our generation needs greatness. Mistakes like opening the Arctic to new drilling are no way to get there.

YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

Bonn Climate Talks Fail to Deliver Common Grounds Undermining Hopes of Meaningful Deal in Paris

Obama Snaps Epic Selfie With Bear Grylls in Alaska

Even Wall Street Asks: 'Why Would You Not?' Take Action on Climate Change

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

Pexels

By Dan Nosowitz

It's no secret that the past few years have been disastrous for the American farming industry.

Read More Show Less
Pexels

By Gavin Van De Walle, MS, RD

Medium-chain triglyceride (MCT) oil and coconut oil are fats that have risen in popularity alongside the ketogenic, or keto, diet.

Read More Show Less
Sponsored
Pexels

By Bijal Trivedi

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) released a report on Nov. 13 that describes a list of microorganisms that have become resistant to antibiotics and pose a serious threat to public health. Each year these so-called superbugs cause more than 2.8 million infections in the U.S. and kill more than 35,000 people.

Read More Show Less
Rool Paap / Flickr / CC BY 2.0

By Franziska Spritzler, RD, CDE

Inflammation can be good or bad depending on the situation.

Read More Show Less

By Joe Vukovich

Under the guise of responding to consumer complaints that today's energy- and water-efficient dishwashers take too long, the Department of Energy has proposed creating a new class of dishwashers that wouldn't be subject to any water or energy efficiency standards at all. The move would not only undermine three decades of progress for consumers and the environment, it is based on serious distortions of fact regarding today's dishwashers.

Read More Show Less
Sponsored

By Emily Moran

If you have oak trees in your neighborhood, perhaps you've noticed that some years the ground is carpeted with their acorns, and some years there are hardly any. Biologists call this pattern, in which all the oak trees for miles around make either lots of acorns or almost none, "masting."

Read More Show Less

By Catherine Davidson

Tashi Yudon peeks out from behind a net curtain at the rooftops below and lets out a sigh, her breath frosting on the windowpane in front of her.

Some 700 kilometers away in the capital city Delhi, temperatures have yet to dip below 25 degrees Celsius, but in Spiti there is already an atmosphere of impatient expectation as winter settles over the valley.

Read More Show Less

The Dog Aging Project at the University of Washington is looking to recruit 10,000 dogs to study for the next 10 years to see if they can improve the life expectancy of man's best friend and their quality of life, as CNN reported.

Read More Show Less