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Arctic Ice Melt Affects Weather Patterns All Over North Atlantic

Climate

The sharp decline in Arctic sea ice is affecting not only glaciers in Greenland but also weather patterns all over the North Atlantic.

A meltwater stream near the margin of the Greenland ice sheet. Photo credit: Henrik Egede Lassen / Alpha Film

A study last week shows that frequency of summer “blocking” events, capable of producing extreme and stagnant weather, has increased since the 1980s. This has resulted in more warm air over Greenland and the temperature difference between the Arctic and temperate Atlantic has driven events like 2012's record wet summer in the UK.

High pressure weather systems over Greenland. Photo credit: University of Plymouth/Helen Nance/Len Wood

For a deeper dive: Washington PostGuardianNature World News

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