Quantcast

Apple's Commitment to Run All Data Centers on 100% Renewable Energy Continues With New Announcement

Business

The green energy news continues to pour out of Apple headquarters.

Apple has invested big in solar farms, working on shrinking its global footprint as much as possible. Photo credit: Apple

Apple boasts that all its data centers are now powered by green, renewable energy. It's just added two more projects to the list. The company is planning to spend $1.7 million euros (about $1,93o,oooUSD) to build state-of-the-art data centers in Athenry in County Galway, western Ireland and Viborg in Jutland, central Denmark, that will run on 100 percent renewable energy. They'll be powering services such as the iTunes shop, Siri and iMessage for the European market.

“We are grateful for Apple’s continued success in Europe and proud that our investment supports communities across the continent,” said Apple CEO Tim Cook. “This significant new investment represents Apple’s biggest project in Europe to date. We’re thrilled to be expanding our operations, creating hundreds of local jobs and introducing some of our most advanced green building designs yet.”

The two facilities will not only be entirely powered by renewable energy—most likely wind—but will also look for other ways to lower their environmental impact and work with partners on renewable energy projects. In Athenry, Apple plans to recover land that was used for growing non-native trees for harvesting and plant native trees there, along with community walking trails and an education center for local schools. The new Viborg center will be located next to one of Denmark's largest electrical substations to eliminate the need for additional generators. The facility will also capture excess heat from its equipment and conduct it into the district heating system to warm homes in the nearby community.


New data centers in Ireland and Denmark will add to Apple's portfolio of all-renewably powered facilities around the world. Photo credit: Apple

This latest news follows on the heels of Apple's announcement two weeks ago of a $850 million investment in a solar farm in California that will power its new campus in Silicon Valley, all its California offices and data centers, and its data center in Newark.

“We believe that innovation is about leaving the world better than we found it, and that the time for tackling climate change is now,” said Lisa Jackson, Apple’s vice president of environmental initiatives. “We’re excited to spur green industry growth in Ireland and Denmark and develop energy systems that take advantage of their strong wind resources. Our commitment to environmental responsibility is good for the planet, good for our business and good for the European economy.”

The data centers in Ireland and Denmark are both scheduled to open in 2017.

YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

Tim Cook: New Solar Farm Will Be Apple's 'Biggest, Boldest and Most Ambitious Project Ever'

Kaiser Doubles Down on Investments in Renewables to Reduce Impacts of Climate Change

Nation’s Largest Solar Farm on Public Lands Now Online

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

Pick one of these nine activism styles, and you can start making change. YES! Illustrations by Delphine Lee

By Cathy Brown

Most of us have heard about UN researchers warning that we need to make dramatic changes in the next 12 years to limit our risk of extreme heat, drought, floods and poverty caused by climate change. Report after report about a bleak climate future can leave people in despair.

Read More Show Less
Jamie Grill Photography / Getty Images

Losing weight, improving heart health and decreasing your chances for metabolic diseases like diabetes may be as simple as cutting back on a handful of Oreos or saying no to a side of fries, according to a new study published in the journal The Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology.

Read More Show Less
Sponsored
Golde Wallingford submitted this photo of "Pure Joy" to EcoWatch's first photo contest. Golde Wallingford

EcoWatch is pleased to announce our third photo contest!

Read More Show Less
A boy gives an impromptu speech about him not wanting to die in the next 10 years during the protest on July 15. The Scottish wing of the Extinction Rebellion environmental group of Scotland locked down Glasgow's Trongate for 12 hours in protest of climate change. Stewart Kirby / SOPA Images / LightRocket / Getty Images

It's important to remember that one person can make a difference. From teenagers to world-renowned scientists, individuals are inspiring positive shifts around the world. Maybe you won't become a hard-core activist, but this list of people below can inspire simple ways to kickstart better habits. Here are seven people advocating for a better planet.

Read More Show Less
A group of wind turbines in a field in Banffshire, Northeast Scotland. Universal Images Group / Getty Images

Scotland produced enough power from wind turbines in the first half of 2019, that it could power Scotland twice over. Put another way, it's enough energy to power all of Scotland and most of Northern England, according to the BBC — an impressive step for the United Kingdom, which pledged to be carbon neutral in 30 years.

Read More Show Less
Sponsored
Beekeeper Jeff Anderson works with members of his family in this photo from 2014. He once employed all of his adult children but can no longer afford to do so. CHRIS JORDAN-BLOCH / EARTHJUSTICE

By Jessica A. Knoblauch

It's been a particularly terrible summer for bees. Recently, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) announced it is allowing the bee-killing pesticide sulfoxaflor back on the market. And just a few weeks prior, the USDA announced it is suspending data collection for its annual honeybee survey, which tracks honeybee populations across the U.S., providing critical information to farmers and scientists.

Read More Show Less

tommaso79 / iStock / Getty Images Plus

By Rachel Licker

As a new mom, I've had to think about heat safety in many new ways since pregnant women and young children are among the most vulnerable to extreme heat.

Read More Show Less
Pexels

By Kris Gunnars, BSc

It's easy to get confused about which foods are healthy and which aren't.

Read More Show Less