Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Help Support EcoWatch

Apple's Commitment to Run All Data Centers on 100% Renewable Energy Continues With New Announcement

Business
Apple's Commitment to Run All Data Centers on 100% Renewable Energy Continues With New Announcement

The green energy news continues to pour out of Apple headquarters.

Apple has invested big in solar farms, working on shrinking its global footprint as much as possible. Photo credit: Apple

Apple boasts that all its data centers are now powered by green, renewable energy. It's just added two more projects to the list. The company is planning to spend $1.7 million euros (about $1,93o,oooUSD) to build state-of-the-art data centers in Athenry in County Galway, western Ireland and Viborg in Jutland, central Denmark, that will run on 100 percent renewable energy. They'll be powering services such as the iTunes shop, Siri and iMessage for the European market.

“We are grateful for Apple’s continued success in Europe and proud that our investment supports communities across the continent,” said Apple CEO Tim Cook. “This significant new investment represents Apple’s biggest project in Europe to date. We’re thrilled to be expanding our operations, creating hundreds of local jobs and introducing some of our most advanced green building designs yet.”

The two facilities will not only be entirely powered by renewable energy—most likely wind—but will also look for other ways to lower their environmental impact and work with partners on renewable energy projects. In Athenry, Apple plans to recover land that was used for growing non-native trees for harvesting and plant native trees there, along with community walking trails and an education center for local schools. The new Viborg center will be located next to one of Denmark's largest electrical substations to eliminate the need for additional generators. The facility will also capture excess heat from its equipment and conduct it into the district heating system to warm homes in the nearby community.


New data centers in Ireland and Denmark will add to Apple's portfolio of all-renewably powered facilities around the world. Photo credit: Apple

This latest news follows on the heels of Apple's announcement two weeks ago of a $850 million investment in a solar farm in California that will power its new campus in Silicon Valley, all its California offices and data centers, and its data center in Newark.

“We believe that innovation is about leaving the world better than we found it, and that the time for tackling climate change is now,” said Lisa Jackson, Apple’s vice president of environmental initiatives. “We’re excited to spur green industry growth in Ireland and Denmark and develop energy systems that take advantage of their strong wind resources. Our commitment to environmental responsibility is good for the planet, good for our business and good for the European economy.”

The data centers in Ireland and Denmark are both scheduled to open in 2017.

YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

Tim Cook: New Solar Farm Will Be Apple's 'Biggest, Boldest and Most Ambitious Project Ever'

Kaiser Doubles Down on Investments in Renewables to Reduce Impacts of Climate Change

Nation’s Largest Solar Farm on Public Lands Now Online

In an ad released by Republican Voters Against Trump, former coronavirus task force member Olivia Troye roasted the president for his response. Republican Voters Against Trump / YouTube

Yet another former Trump administration staffer has come out with an endorsement for former Vice President Joe Biden, this time in response to President Donald Trump's handling of the coronavirus pandemic.

Read More Show Less

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

Climate Group

Every September for the past 11 years, non-profit the Climate Group has hosted Climate Week NYC, a chance for business, government, activist and community leaders to come together and discuss solutions to the climate crisis.

Read More Show Less

Trending

A field of sunflowers near the Mehrum coal-fired power station, wind turbines and high-voltage lines in the Peine district of Germany on Aug. 3, 2020. Julian Stratenschulte / picture alliance via Getty Images

By Elliot Douglas

The coronavirus pandemic has altered economic priorities for governments around the world. But as wildfires tear up the west coast of the United States and Europe reels after one of its hottest summers on record, tackling climate change remains at the forefront of economic policy.

Read More Show Less
Monarch butterflies in Mexico's Oyamel forest in Michoacan, Mexico after migrating from Canada. Luis Acosta / AFP / Getty Images

By D. André Green II

One of nature's epic events is underway: Monarch butterflies' fall migration. Departing from all across the United States and Canada, the butterflies travel up to 2,500 miles to cluster at the same locations in Mexico or along the Pacific Coast where their great-grandparents spent the previous winter.

Read More Show Less
The 30th First Annual Ig Nobel Prize Ceremony on Sept. 17 introduced ten new Ig Nobel Prize winners, each intended to make people "laugh then think." Improbable Research / YouTube

The annual Ig Nobel prizes were awarded Thursday by the science humor magazine Annals of Improbable Research for scientific experiments that seem somewhat absurd, but are also thought-provoking. This was the 30th year the awards have been presented, but the first time they were not presented at Harvard University. Instead, they were delivered in a 75-minute pre-recorded ceremony.

Read More Show Less

Support Ecowatch