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Antiquated Mining Law Threatens Water Supply

Antiquated Mining Law Threatens Water Supply

Earthworks

The scenic Santa Rita Mountains, south of Tucson, Ariz., are an ecological haven and a recreational playground. The Santa Ritas are home to rare and endangered plants and animals, an active tourist economy, and the headwaters for part of Tucson's water supply.

And they’re under threat from the Rosemont mine proposal, thanks to the 1872 Mining Law which gives mining priority over almost all other land uses.

A Canadian investment company, with no previous mining experience, has proposed an open pit copper mine—a mile in diameter, a half mile deep, in the middle of Santa Ritas.

The mine would transform a desert refuge into an industrial zone, destroying the ecosystem and the economy that depends upon it.

To decide whether to permit this mine, the U.S. Forest Service has prepared a Draft Environmental Impact statement and is accepting comments.

Take Action—tell the Forest Service the scenic Santa Ritas are no place for a mine.

Instructions:

  • Send/amend the sample letter by clicking here. Personalized letters have a much greater impact.
  • Send your letter to the Coronado National Forest, which is charged with evaluating the Rosemont mine proposal.
  • Share this alert with your friends and family via the subsequent page. Share via email, Facebook, Twitter and/or Google+.

Also, take a look at these informative sources:

For more information, click here.

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