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Anti-Fracking Rally in Kent, Ohio

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Anti-Fracking Rally in Kent, Ohio

EcoWatch

On Feb. 11, nearly 100 people marched in support of Concerned Citizens of Portage County from downtown Kent, Ohio to Kent State University protesting the process of hydraulic fracturing.

Food & Water Watch joined local grassroots activists for the march and rally to say no to fracking and protect the rights of local citizens to clean air and water.

In Portage County, the oil and gas industry has already fracked two wells. Permits have been issued for many more. Officials from the county have been performing road tests to determine whether the increased heavy truck traffic will harm local roads.

Residents who can afford it, have begun gathering and testing water samples so they have recourse should their water get contaminated from nearby drilling for natural gas. The stage has been set for fracking to come to Kent, and the resistance of the community is critical at this point.

To view photos from the march, click here.

Stayed tuned to EcoWatch.org and visit our fracking page for daily updates on this issue and more. Video from today's rally will be posted soon.

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