Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Another Poll Shows Bernie Beating Hillary

Politics
Another Poll Shows Bernie Beating Hillary

If you watched the first GOP primary debate or listened to many of the pundits this campaign season, Hillary Clinton has been the presumed Democratic presidential nominee from the get-go. Bernie Sanders is being called the dark horse candidate and the media has given him the short shrift, even though he has turned out record crowds at rallies all across the country. However, another poll in New Hampshire this month reveals that Sanders has overtaken Clinton as the frontrunner for the Democratic nomination in that state. The poll shows Sanders leading 42 to 35 percent.

Rather unsurprisingly, Sanders has a 26-point lead over Clinton among younger voters between the ages of 18 and 45. And even a 10-point lead among those 46 and older.

But the polls do reveal some very surprising facts. More women hold a favorable view of Sanders than of Clinton, who, if elected, would be the first female president in the nation's history.

Read page 1

And what's more, Sanders is even polling stronger among moderates.

It's important to note it's still early and there is much media speculation about a Biden run. Polls out of Iowa show Clinton is still leading in that state, but Sanders is gaining on her. Current polling puts Clinton at 37 percent and Sanders at 30. Still though, nobody can deny Sanders' growing popularity. He has drawn more than 100,000 people to recent rallies. And many have already speculated as to why Sanders is gaining ground on Clinton. Certainly, Sanders' opposition to economic inequality, a belief in the need for a livable wage and his promotion of universal healthcare are all part of his mass appeal. And Clinton's ongoing email scandal is certainly not helping her. But one explanation for the "Sanders surge" lies in how the candidates differ on environmental issues.

Sanders has been hailed as a climate warrior and has taken a strong stance against the Keystone XL, while Clinton has failed to take a position on the controversial pipeline. However, Clinton has called climate change "one of the defining threats of our time," pledged to have every home powered by renewables by 2027 and most recently announced her opposition to drilling in the Arctic.

Still, despite the rhetoric, many including Bill McKibben feel that "climate change feels like a late add-on" for Clinton rather than a core issue for her. Several pundits have accused Clinton, a longtime centrist, of "moving to the left" and adopting many of Sanders' positions to contend with the self-described "democratic socialist." In contrast, Sanders has spent his time in the Senate as a champion of climate issues.

YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

10 Reasons Bernie Sanders Is 'Rockin' in the Free World'

Charles Koch Blasts President Obama for Comments Made at Climate Speech

Why Is the World Obsessed With Donald Trump?

Ningaloo Reef near Exmouth on April 2, 2012 in Western Australia. James D. Morgan / Getty Images News

By Dana M Bergstrom, Euan Ritchie, Lesley Hughes and Michael Depledge

In 1992, 1,700 scientists warned that human beings and the natural world were "on a collision course." Seventeen years later, scientists described planetary boundaries within which humans and other life could have a "safe space to operate." These are environmental thresholds, such as the amount of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere and changes in land use.

Read More Show Less

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

A 3-hour special film by EarthxTV calls for protection of the Amazon and its indigenous populations. EarthxTV.org

To save the planet, we must save the Amazon rainforest. To save the rainforest, we must save its indigenous peoples. And to do that, we must demarcate their land.

Read More Show Less

Trending

UN Secretary General Antonio Guterres delivers a video speech at the high-level meeting of the 46th session of the United Nations Human Rights Council UNHRC in Geneva, Switzerland on Feb. 22, 2021. Xinhua / Zhang Cheng via Getty Images

By Anke Rasper

"Today's interim report from the UNFCCC is a red alert for our planet," said UN Secretary General Antonio Guterres.

The report, released Friday, looks at the national climate efforts of 75 states that have already submitted their updated "nationally determined contributions," or NDCs. The countries included in the report are responsible for about 30% of the world's global greenhouse gas emissions.

Read More Show Less
New Delhi's smog is particularly thick, increasing the risk of vehicle accidents. SAJJAD HUSSAIN / AFP via Getty Images

India's New Delhi has been called the "world air pollution capital" for its high concentrations of particulate matter that make it harder for its residents to breathe and see. But one thing has puzzled scientists, according to The Guardian. Why does New Delhi see more blinding smogs than other polluted Asian cities, such as Beijing?

Read More Show Less
A bridge over the Delaware river connects New Hope, Pennsylvania with Lambertville, New Jersey. Richard T. Nowitz / Getty Images

In a historic move, the Delaware River Basin Commission (DRBC) voted Thursday to ban hydraulic fracking in the region. The ban was supported by all four basin states — New Jersey, Delaware, Pennsylvania and New York — putting a permanent end to hydraulic fracking for natural gas along the 13,539-square-mile basin, The Philadelphia Inquirer reported.

Read More Show Less