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Thousands March on 5th Anniversary of Superstorm Sandy

Five years ago Sunday, Hurricane Sandy slammed into the Northeast U.S., killing dozens of people and swamping parts of New York City under as much as 9 feet of water. The storm caused more than $70 billion in damage.

Saturday, a broad coalition of local, state, national and global organizations marched across the Brooklyn Bridge to commemorate the 5th anniversary of Superstorm Sandy and demand bold powerful action from state and local officials.


According to 350.org:

Organizers are remembering the lives and livelihoods lost to Superstorm Sandy and demanding bold and swift climate action from New York's elected officials. Demands include actionable steps for Mayor Bill de Blasio, Governor Andrew Cuomo, Senator Chuck Schumer to address unmet needs from the storm's devastation, protect communities vulnerable to inevitable future storms, and secure transformative policies to make New York a true climate leader.

A recent study predicts that catastrophic flooding in New York City, similar to destruction from Sandy, will become far more common in the coming decades.

Reposted with permission from our media associate Common Dreams.

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