Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

U.S. Beer Giant Unveils Ambitious 2025 Sustainability Goals

Business

Anheuser-Busch—the St. Louis-based brewer behind Budweiser, Busch, Michelob and more—announced Tuesday a seven-year deadline on a slew of sustainability targets.

The company's new U.S. 2025 Sustainability Goals focus on four key areas: renewable electricity and carbon reduction, water stewardship, smart agriculture and circular packaging.


Among the goals, the company wants 100 percent of its purchased electricity to come from renewable sources by 2025, as well as a 25 percent reduction of carbon dioxide emissions across the value chain.

It also wants 100 percent of its facilities to be engaged in "water efficiency efforts," and all of its packaging to either be returnable or made with majority recycled content by the same deadline.

"More and more, consumers are choosing to engage with companies that are doing good in the world," said Anheuser-Busch President and CEO Michel Doukeris in a statement provided to EcoWatch. "As the leading American brewer, we have a responsibility to set an example and be good stewards of the environment. It's not just the right thing to do, it's good for business."

Also Tuesday, along with Anheuser-Busch's 2025 goals initiative, Budweiser announced that all Buds sold in the U.S. will feature the "100% Renewable Electricity" symbol. The new logo will start appearing this Earth Day on April 22.

"The symbol celebrates that Anheuser-Busch, through its partnership with Enel Green Power, now secures 50 percent of its purchased electricity from wind power—more than the electricity used to brew Budweiser in the U.S. each year," Anheuser-Busch touted.

Anheuser-Busch's new initiatives build on the 2025 Global Sustainability Goals recently announced by Belgian parent company and world's largest brewery, AB InBev. Last year, the global beer giant vowed to completely shift from fossil fuels by 2025, including investing in their own renewable energy sources.

"We take great pride in our sustainability efforts and our long history of striving to be good stewards of the environment. Now, we are challenging ourselves to do more," Doukeris said. "Our company has been around for 165 years, and these goals will ensure that we continue to make meaningful contributions toward building strong communities and a healthy environment for the next 165 years."

Doukeris told FOX Business that the company's new green efforts will not increase the price of its brews. Rather, President Trump's new 10 percent tariff on aluminum will.

"We are always concerned with the cost of input and output costs for consumers and retailers. Aluminum is a very important item, so as these costs [go] up, it will dramatically impact the final cost of beer and can have impact on the number of jobs," he said.

Last month, AB InBev CEO Carlos Brito told Bloomberg that the cost could increase up to 3 percent.

"When you put tariffs on aluminum in the U.S., for sure that will increase the price of beer for consumers," Brito said. "For example, 10 percent on aluminum at the current prices, that will represent 2 percent to 3 percent more pricing for the consumer. That's more than inflation."

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

The Ernest N. Morial Convention Center in New Orleans, Louisiana has been converted to a 1,000-bed field hospital for coronavirus patients to alleviate stress on local hospitals. Chris Graythen / Getty Images

An area in Louisiana whose predominantly black and brown residents are hard-hit by health problems from industry overdevelopment is experiencing one of the highest death rates from coronavirus of any county in the United States.

Read More Show Less
A woman lies in bed with the flu. marka/Universal Images Group via Getty Images

A central player in the fight against the novel coronavirus is our immune system. It protects us against the invader and can even be helpful for its therapy. But sometimes it can turn against us.

Read More Show Less
Sponsored
Several flower species, including the orchid, can recover quickly from severe injury, scientists have found. cunfek / iStock / Getty Images Plus

Calling someone a delicate flower may not sting like it used to, according to new research. Scientists have found that many delicate flowers are actually remarkably hearty and able to bounce back from severe injury.

Read More Show Less
A Boeing 727 flies over approach lights with a trail of black-smoke from the engines on April 9, 2018. aviation-images.com / Universal Images Group via Getty Images

With global air travel at a near standstill, the airline industry is looking to rewrite the rules it agreed to tackle global emissions. The Guardian reports that the airline is billing it as a matter of survival, while environmental activists are accusing the industry of trying to dodge their obligations.

Read More Show Less
A National Guard member works on election day at a polling location on April 7, 2020 in Madison, Wisconsin. Andy Manis / Getty Images.

ByJulia Baumel

The outbreak of COVID-19 across the U.S. has touched every facet of our society, and our democracy has been no exception.

Read More Show Less