Quantcast

Angry Birds Mobilizes Millions to Save Endangered Species and #ActOnClimate

Climate

Finnish company Rovio, which makes the hugely popular game app Angry Birds, isn't content to sit back and rest on its laurels. It's using the clout gained through its more than 2 billion downloads of Angry Birds editions to go to bat for real-life birds, whose existence in the Cook Islands of the Pacific South Seas is jeopardized by non-native predators.

"The birds of the Pacific are seriously angry because predators have invaded their islands and are eating all their eggs," says the company.

Angry Birds is headed to the South Seas islands to protect the eggs of endangered bird species against predators. Image credit: Rovio

In response, Angry Birds has partnered with conservation nonprofit BirdLife International and crowdfunding site kriticalmass to raise money and awareness about the blight of these endangered species. Its new Angry Birds Season Tropigal Paradise educates users about these birds and how they can help them. The campaign hopes to raise $150,000 to fund the on-the-ground work of BirdLife in restoring these islands as safe habitats for the birds.

"Animals such as rats scuttled onto the land from the boats of people who were visiting, where they thrived on the local plants and animals found there," says the kriticalmass campaign. "The introduction of these new predators changed the delicate ecological balance on the islands and drove many beautiful species to extinction. Since people arrived, half of all the original bird species are now extinct—never to be seen again. This tragedy continues with 45 species on the brink of extinction today. The non-native predators also cause major problems for the people of the islands—eating their food and transmitting diseases. Just like in the game, these real-life angry birds and the community they live in need our help to defeat the predators before it’s too late."

With the money raised by the campaign, BirdLife is headed to the French Polynesian islands of Kamaka and Manui. There it will use the funds to hire boats, bait-spreading helicopters and expert staff to implement the removal of the invasive predators and put in place monitoring systems to prevent their return.

This isn't the first time Angry Birds has used its vast network of gamers to raise awareness about environmental issues. Last November, it ran a competition called "Roll With the Pangolins," to call attention to the plight of this Indonesian scaly anteater which has been poached to near extinction. The contest's spokesperson was England's Prince William, president of partnering organization United for Wildlife.

And last month at Global Citizen 2015 Earth Day at the National Mall in Washington DC, it announced its "Champions for Earth" experience, which will be integrated into the game in September to coincide with UN General Assembly events in New York. It's working in partnership with Earth Day Network.

“For years, many of our games have supported initiatives regarding earth sustainability, climate change and preservation," said Rovio creative director Patrick Liu. "It is a real privilege to work with Earth Day Network on an Angry Birds gaming experience to raise awareness of climate change. It’s a cause that really matters to us both and to Angry Birds fans as well. Stay tuned. This will be fun."

“By leveraging the global reach and informational power of gaming technology, Earth Day Network and Rovio Entertainment will mobilize millions around the world to take action on climate change,” added Earth Day Network president Kathleen Rogers.

YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

David Suzuki: How to Save the Monarch Butterfly

Lowe's to Stop Selling Bee-Killing Pesticides to Protect Pollinators

250,000 People Call for Action on Climate Change and an End to Extreme Poverty

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

A glacier is seen in the Kenai Mountains on Sept. 6, near Primrose, Alaska. Scientists from the U.S. Geological Survey have been studying the glaciers in the area since 1966 and their studies show that the warming climate has resulted in sustained glacial mass loss as melting outpaced the accumulation of new snow and ice. Joe Raedle / Getty Images

By Mark Mancini

On Aug. 18, Iceland held a funeral for the first glacier lost to climate change. The deceased party was Okjökull, a historic body of ice that covered 14.6 square miles (38 square kilometers) in the Icelandic Highlands at the turn of the 20th century. But its glory days are long gone. In 2014, having dwindled to less than 1/15 its former size, Okjökull lost its status as an official glacier.

Read More Show Less
Members of Chicago Democratic Socialists of America table at the Logan Square Farmers Market on Aug. 18. Alex Schwartz

By Alex Schwartz

Among the many vendors at the Logan Square Farmers Market on Aug. 18 sat three young people peddling neither organic vegetables, gourmet cheese nor handmade crafts. Instead, they offered liberation from capitalism.

Read More Show Less
Sponsored
StephanieFrey / iStock / Getty Images

By Lauren Panoff, MPH, RD

Muffins are a popular, sweet treat.

Read More Show Less
Hackney primary school students went to the Town Hall on May 24 in London after school to protest about the climate emergency. Jenny Matthews / In Pictures / Getty Images

By Caroline Hickman

Eco-anxiety is likely to affect more and more people as the climate destabilizes. Already, studies have found that 45 percent of children suffer lasting depression after surviving extreme weather and natural disasters. Some of that emotional turmoil must stem from confusion — why aren't adults doing more to stop climate change?

Read More Show Less
Myrtle warbler. Gillfoto / Flickr / CC BY-SA 2.0

Bird watching in the U.S. may be a lot harder than it once was, since bird populations are dropping off in droves, according to a new study.

Read More Show Less
Sponsored
Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos announces the co-founding of The Climate Pledge at the National Press Club on Sept. 19 in Washington, DC. Paul Morigi / Getty Images for Amazon

The day before over 1,500 Amazon.com employees planned a walkout to participate in today's global climate strike, CEO Jeff Bezos unveiled a sweeping plan for the retail and media giant to be carbon neutral by 2040, 10 years ahead of the Paris agreement schedule.

Read More Show Less

By Winona LaDuke

For the past seven years, the Anishinaabe people have been facing the largest tar sands pipeline project in North America. We still are. In these dying moments of the fossil fuel industry, Water Protectors stand, prepared for yet another battle for the water, wild rice and future of all. We face Enbridge, the largest pipeline company in North America, and the third largest corporation in Canada. We face it unafraid and eyes wide open, for indeed we see the future.

Read More Show Less
The climate crisis often intensifies systems of oppression. Rieko Honma / Stone / Getty Images Plus

By Mara Dolan

We see the effects of the climate crisis all around us in hurricanes, droughts, wildfires, and rising sea levels, but our proximity to these things, and how deeply our lives are changed by them, are not the same for everyone. Frontline groups have been leading the fight for environmental and climate justice for centuries and understand the critical connections between the climate crisis and racial justice, economic justice, migrant justice, and gender justice. Our personal experiences with climate change are shaped by our experiences with race, gender, and class, as the climate crisis often intensifies these systems of oppression.

Read More Show Less