Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Help Support EcoWatch

American Chemistry Council Caught Lying to 21 State Legislators

American Chemistry Council Caught Lying to 21 State Legislators

Safer Chemicals Healthy Families

Today, it was discovered by a group of 21 current and former state legislators that the American Chemistry Council has lied regarding its involvement in legislation to restrict toxic flame retardant chemicals. On Monday, a group of 21 current and former state legislators and legislative leaders from 10 states who had sponsored or worked directly on bans of toxic flame retardant chemicals in their respective states called on the American Chemistry Council (ACC) to account for the unethical actions of their members during the legislative debates, as outlined in the Chicago Tribune expose Playing with Fire and witnessed by state legislators across the country.

In response, ACC CEO Cal Dooley responded to legislators yesterday promising no action on the part of the ACC and claiming that the ACC itself does not get involved in state legislation regarding flame retardants. Dooley wrote: "These three companies are long-time members of the American Chemistry Council (ACC), but ACC does not advocate with state legislatures or state regulatory agencies on their behalf related to flame retardant chemistries."

Legislators immediately recognized the ACC's claim as false.  The ACC pays registered lobbyists all over the country to lobby against the ban of various flame retardants in the states on behalf of the ACC and their member companies. Documented evidence from Maine, Washington, and California show the ACC paying registered lobbyists to work directly on flame retardant bans, direct testimony from the ACC on flame retardant bans, and sign-on letters in various states with the ACC listed as one of the groups opposed to the state legislation.

--------

The Safer Chemicals Healthy Families (SCHF) coalition represents more than 11 million individuals and includes parents, health professionals, advocates for people with learning and developmental disabilities, reproductive health advocates, environmentalists and businesses from across the nation. The coalition of diverse groups is united by their common concern about toxic chemicals in our homes, places of work, and products we use every day.

 Visit EcoWatch’s BIODIVERSITY page for more related news on this topic.

A grim new assessment of the world's flora and fungi has found that two-fifths of its species are at risk of extinction as humans encroach on the natural world, as The Guardian reported. That puts the number of species at risk near 140,000.

Read More Show Less

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

Flowers like bladderwort have changed their UV pigment levels in response to the climate crisis. Jean and Fred / CC BY 2.0

As human activity transforms the atmosphere, flowers are changing their colors.

Read More Show Less

Trending

A factory in Newark, N.J. emits smoke in the shadow of NYC on January 18, 2018. Kena Betancur / VIEWpress / Corbis / Getty Images

By Sharon Zhang

Back in March, when the pandemic had just planted its roots in the U.S., President Donald Trump directed the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to do something devastating: The agency was to indefinitely and cruelly suspend environmental rule enforcement. The EPA complied, and for just under half a year, it provided over 3,000 waivers that granted facilities clemency from state-level environmental rule compliance.

Read More Show Less
A meteoroid skims the earth's atmosphere on Sept. 22, 2020. European Space Agency

A rare celestial event was caught on camera last week when a meteoroid "bounced" off Earth's atmosphere and veered back into space.

Read More Show Less
A captive elephant is seen at Howletts Wild Animal Park in Littlebourne, England. Suvodeb Banerjee / Flickr / CC by 2.0

By Bob Jacobs

Hanako, a female Asian elephant, lived in a tiny concrete enclosure at Japan's Inokashira Park Zoo for more than 60 years, often in chains, with no stimulation. In the wild, elephants live in herds, with close family ties. Hanako was solitary for the last decade of her life.

Read More Show Less

Support Ecowatch