Quantcast

America Recycles Day Puts Spotlight on Reduce, Reuse, Recycle

What happens to the stuff we throw away?

About 53 percent of it goes into landfills, according to the U.S. EPA. About 12 percent is combusted for energy. About 35 percent is recycled.

Aluminum cans are collected at Cleveland Metroparks Zoo's America Recycles Day. Proceeds from the aluminum cans collected will benefit the international slow loris conservation organization, The Little Fireface Project. Photo credit: Mark Horning

Keep America Beautiful wants to make that percentage of recycled waste higher. So it launched America Recycles Day, a day dedicated to promoting and celebrating recycling through thousands of grassroots events held across the nation.

Want to hold an event? America Recycles Day provides toolkits and guides for would-be organizers. Want to participate in an event? Find one near you.

One such event is in Cleveland, where the Cleveland Metroparks Zoo will give visitors who bring in select recyclables a free admission with the purchase of a regular admission from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Saturday, Nov. 9.

Eligible materials include aluminum cans, cell phones and rechargeable phone batteries, newspaper, catalogs, junk mail, magazines, ink jet and toner print cartridges, cooking and dining supplies and utensils, and pairs of shoes (no single shoes, rubber flip flops, ice skates, roller skates, slippers, ski boots or completely ruined or broken footwear will be accepted).

The Cleveland Metroparks Zoo will offer free document shredding from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. (limit three bags or boxes), an area of exhibitors who promote different aspects of “reduce, reuse, recycle,” conservation games and crafts.

Proceeds from the aluminum cans collected will benefit The Little Fireface Project, an international conservation organization focused on the slow loris.

The video below is part of The Recycling Campaign, sponsored by Keep America Beautiful and the Ad Council. 

 

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

A verdant and productive urban garden in Havana. Susanne Bollinger / Wikimedia Commons

By Paul Brown

When countries run short of food, they need to find solutions fast, and one answer can be urban farming.

Read More Show Less
Trevor Noah appears on set during a taping of "The Daily Show with Trevor Noah" in New York on Nov. 26, 2018. The Daily Show With Trevor Noah / YouTube screenshot

By Lakshmi Magon

This year, three studies showed that humor is useful for engaging the public about climate change. The studies, published in The Journal of Science Communication, Comedy Studies and Science Communication, added to the growing wave of scientists, entertainers and politicians who agree.

Read More Show Less
Sponsored
rhodesj / Flickr / CC BY 2.0

Cities around the country are considering following the lead of Berkeley, California, which became the first city to ban the installation of natural gas lines in new homes this summer.

Read More Show Less
Rebecca Burgess came up with the idea of a fibersheds project to develop an eco-friendly, locally sourced wardrobe. Nicolás Boullosa / CC BY 2.0

By Tara Lohan

If I were to open my refrigerator, the origins of most of the food wouldn't be too much of a mystery — the milk, cheese and produce all come from relatively nearby farms. I can tell from the labels on other packaged goods if they're fair trade, non-GMO or organic.

Read More Show Less
A television crew reports on Hurricane Dorian while waves crash against the Banana River sea wall. Paul Hennessy / SOPA Images / LightRocket / Getty Images

By Mark Hertsgaard and Kyle Pope

Some good news, for a change, about climate change: When hundreds of newsrooms focus their attention on the climate crisis, all at the same time, the public conversation about the problem gets better: more prominent, more informative, more urgent.

Read More Show Less
Sponsored
U.S. Senators Chris Coons (D-Del.) and Mike Braun (R-Ind.) met with Bill Gates on Nov. 7 to discuss climate change and ways to address the challenge. Senator Chris Coons

The U.S. Senate's bipartisan climate caucus started with just two members, a Republican from Indiana and a Democrat from Delaware. Now it's up to eight members after two Democrats, one Independent and three more Republicans joined the caucus last week, as The Hill reported.

Read More Show Less
EPA scientists survey aquatic life in Newport, Oregon. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is proposing to significantly limit the use of science in agency rulemaking around public health, the The New York Times reports.

Read More Show Less
A timelapse video shows synthetic material and baby fish collected from a plankton sample from a surface slick taken off Hawaii's coast. Honolulu Star-Advertiser / YouTube screenshot

A team of researchers led by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration didn't intend to study plastic pollution when they towed a tiny mesh net through the waters off Hawaii's West Coast. Instead, they wanted to learn more about the habits of larval fish.

Read More Show Less