Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Al Roker Tells Larry King: Snowstorms Are Due to Climate Change

Climate
Al Roker Tells Larry King: Snowstorms Are Due to Climate Change

It's almost taboo for TV weather forecasters to connect the extreme weather patterns we've been seeing to climate change. And if they're not ignoring it, it seems that too many of them are openly denying it.

One TV weather anchor who's sticking with the scientific consensus and not the denier community is long-time NBC Today show forecaster Al Roker. Maybe that's why he was one of a small group of meteorologists invited to the White House to meet with President Obama and top U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) officials in May to discuss the release of the National Climate Assessment report.

He reiterated his beliefs this week in an interview with host Larry King on Larry King Now.

"We've been in a pattern now where five weeks in a row, there's been a storm that comes up and re-forms off the Mid-Atlantic/New England coast and dumps a ton of snow," said Roker. "Boston as of this point is number two snowiest winter."

"Is this all part of climate change?" asked King.

"I think it is," Roker replied.

"You can't point to any one event and say this is climate change," Roker continued. "But what climate change opens the door for and allows for are more extreme swings of weather. So while you've got this ongoing drought out in California, there's been almost no snowpack, no snowfall in the Sierras, it barely has rained, yet you've got monumental forest fires. Here in the East you've got brutal cold. Yet globally January was the warmest month on record. So there's all these swings that are happening. Climate change makes that more possible."

What's behind it, King asked.

"You've got greenhouse gases building up, you've got melt at the polar ice cap," said Roker. "Everything's connected. And when you start changing that balance, nature doesn't like an imbalance."

YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

Must-See Video: Jon Stewart Tackles Climate Deniers in Congress

Watch Bill Nye Shred Climate Denying Congresswoman

Global Warming Deniers Become More Desperate By the Day

A sea turtle rescued from Israel's devastating oil spill. MENAHEM KAHANA / AFP via Getty Images

Rescue workers in Israel are using a surprising cure to save the sea turtles harmed by a devastating oil spill: mayonnaise!

Read More Show Less

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

A "digital twin of Earth." European Space Agency

As the weather grows more severe, and its damages more expensive and fatal, current weather predictions fall short in providing reliable information on Earth's rapidly changing systems.

Read More Show Less

Trending

Melting ice in places such as Greenland could stop a critical ocean current. Paul Souders / Getty Images

The climate crisis could push an important ocean current past a critical tipping point sooner than expected, new research suggests.

Read More Show Less
California Gov. Gavin Newsom tours the Chevron oil field west of Bakersfield, where a spill of more than 900,000 gallons flowed into a dry creek bed, on July 24, 2019. Irfan Khan / Los Angeles Times via Getty Images

By Brett Wilkins

Accusing California regulators of "reckless disregard" for public "health and safety," the environmental advocacy group Center for Biological Diversity on Wednesday sued the administration of Gov. Gavin Newsom for approving thousands of oil and gas drilling and fracking projects without the required environmental review.

Read More Show Less
Nobel Peace Prize Laureate and Kenyan professor Wangari Maathai poses during the COP15 UN Climate Change Conference in Copenhagen, Denmark on December 15, 2009. Olivier Morin / AFP / Getty Images

By Kate Whiting

From Greta Thunberg to Sir David Attenborough, the headline-grabbing climate change activists and environmentalists of today are predominantly white. But like many areas of society, those whose voices are heard most often are not necessarily representative of the whole.

Read More Show Less