Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Help Support EcoWatch

Al Gore: Trump Fails to Derail the Energy Revolution

Climate

By Paul Brown

Donald Trump "cannot rewrite history," and no matter what he says or does the Paris agreement to limit climate change will survive and is even stronger as a result of Trump's rejection. This is the verdict pronounced by a former U.S. vice-president turned climate campaigner as Al Gore spurns Trump for a failed attempt to derail the energy revolution.


Speaking in London last night, Gore said: "I was worried when the president of my country announced he was making an announcement about climate change, that if he hauled the U.S. out of the Paris agreement other nations would use it as an excuse to follow.

"There has been no such cascade. Indeed, no-one else has left. What we have seen is increasing support for the agreement from across the world, and within the US expressions of solidarity from American governors, mayors and business.

"No matter what President Donald Trump says, no-one can stop the energy revolution now."

Improving Lives

Gore was speaking at the Royal Geographical Society in London at a ceremony to present the 2017 Ashden Awards. Ashden gives financial prizes and practical assistance to organizations across the world which promote renewable energy, providing cleaner air and sustainable transport. So far 200 groups, improving the lives of 80 million people, have been honored.

Gore, who first came to the Ashden Awards 10 years ago, served as U.S. vice-president for eight years from 1993, and represented the U.S. in Japan when the Kyoto Protocol was signed in 1997. He was also present at the conclusion of the Paris agreement in 2015.

He now campaigns on climate issues and, with the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, was awarded the 2007 Nobel Peace Prize.

Gore told the Ashden winners that the sustainability revolution, as he called it, was one of the great moral causes of human history. It was like many of the movements of the past—the abolition of slavery, winning women's suffrage, ending apartheid in South Africa and gaining civil rights in America.People said it could not be done, it met all kinds of fierce resistance, but in the end these causes triumphed.

"It boils down in the end to what is right and what is wrong. It is clearly wrong to destroy the Earth for future generations. It is wrong to use the sky as an open sewer. It is right to give future generations hope and to give them a clean and sustainable future."

In a direct repudiation of President Trump's own view of climate change, Gore said the overwhelming scientific evidence was that global warming was already here and a dangerous threat to the Earth.

"The greatest advocate of all, Mother Nature, is telling us what a mess we are creating", Gore said. He spoke of how the Earth's water cycle was being disrupted, sea levels were rising and diseases spreading.

Bypassing Fossil Fuels

But he believed it was possible to change and to save the situation. Human civilization had begun with the agricultural revolution, then in the 19th century the industrial revolution, followed in our lifetimes by the digital revolution. Now it was the sustainability revolution that was under way.

It was happening across the world in rich and poor countries alike. Solar power was bringing electricity to parts of the world that had never seen electric light. People in parts of Africa and Asia were bypassing the fossil fuel age altogether.

For a long time, Gore said, it had seemed that change was too difficult to achieve and could not be completed in time to avoid catastrophe. But then things had begun to "move much faster than you thought they ever could."

He described the strides being made in China and India on renewable energy, particularly on adopting solar power and producing electric cars. "Already we are seeing carbon dioxide emissions stabilize. There is a hint they are beginning to decline. Maybe we have just reached the tipping point," he said.

Reposted with permission from our media associate Climate News Network.

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

An elephant at Roger Williams Park Zoo in Providence, Rhode Island. In Defense of Animals

By Marilyn Kroplick

The term "zoonotic disease" wasn't a hot topic of conversation before the novel coronavirus started spreading across the globe and upending lives. Now, people are discovering how devastating viruses that transfer from animals to humans can be. But the threat can go both ways — animals can also get sick from humans. There is no better time to reconsider the repercussions of keeping animals captive at zoos, for the sake of everyone's health.

Read More Show Less
Isiais now approaches the Carolinas, and is expected to strengthen into a hurricane again before reaching them Monday night. NOAA

Florida was spared the worst of Isaias, the earliest "I" storm on record of the Atlantic hurricane season and the second hurricane of the 2020 season.

Read More Show Less
A campaign targeting SUV advertising is a project between the New Weather Institute and climate charity Possible. New Weather Institute

To meet its climate targets, the UK should ban advertisements for gas-guzzling SUVs, according to a report from a British think tank that wants to make SUVs the new smoking, as the BBC reported.

Read More Show Less

A company from Ghana is making bikes out of bamboo.

By Kate Whiting

Bernice Dapaah calls bamboo "a miracle plant," because it grows so fast and absorbs carbon. But it can also work wonders for children's education and women's employment – as she's discovered.

Read More Show Less
Scientists say it will take a massive amount of collective action to reverse deforestation and save society from collapse. Big Cheese Photo / Getty Images Plus

Deforestation coupled with the rampant destruction of natural resources will soon have devastating effects on the future of society as we know it, according to two theoretical physicists who study complex systems and have concluded that greed has put us on a path to irreversible collapse within the next two to four decades, as VICE reported.

Read More Show Less
Researchers have turned to hydrophones, instruments that use underwater microphones to gather data beyond the reach of any camera or satellite. Pxfuel

By Kristen Pope

Melting and crumbling glaciers are largely responsible for rising sea levels, so learning more about how glaciers shrink is vital to those who hope to save coastal cities and preserve wildlife.

Read More Show Less

Trending

The fact is, cats play different predatory roles in different natural and humanized landscapes. PIXNIO / CCO

By William S. Lynn, Arian Wallach and Francisco J. Santiago-Ávila

A number of conservationists claim cats are a zombie apocalypse for biodiversity that need to be removed from the outdoors by "any means necessary" – coded language for shooting, trapping and poisoning. Various media outlets have portrayed cats as murderous superpredators. Australia has even declared an official "war" against cats.

Read More Show Less