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Al Gore and Neil deGrasse Tyson Talk the Future of Our Planet

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Al Gore and Neil deGrasse Tyson Talk the Future of Our Planet

When many people think about the top science communicators, two of the first names that come to mind are former Vice President Al Gore and astrophysicist Neil deGrasse Tyson.

Watch this never-before-seen interview as the two discuss "spider goats,” old cell phone technology, plummeting renewable energy prices, how technology will continue to change the world and why good science teachers are key to our climate future.

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