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What Will It Take to Ensure the Paris Agreement Is Successful?

The world's first global agreement to fight climate change is in effect. But will we always have Paris?

Last month, the Paris agreement—the world's first global agreement to fight climate change—was signed and sealed. And as of Nov. 4, nearly a year after world leaders from 195 countries came together at the UN's COP 21 last December, it officially entered into force. Which means world leaders will now start talking about how to actually implement the agreement in practical terms.

With the world united around the Paris agreement, we've truly reached a turning point for our planet and we are ready to build on that momentum for the crucial work needed for it to be successful.

But here's the thing: Many people don't even know what the Paris agreement is—or that it offers enormous hope for solving the climate crisis! Will you help teach others about this historic development? Share this article to inform your social network that a sustainable future is in sight.

If you're ready to learn more about what's next for the Paris agreement—and how you can get involved—we hope you'll join us on Dec. 5­–6 for 24 Hours of Reality: The Road Forward. We'll take a look back at the historic events in Paris last year and ultimately answer the question—What will it take to ensure the Paris agreement is successful?

Hosted by former U.S. Vice President Al Gore, The Road Forward will take viewers around the world to the top 24 CO2-emitting nations. We'll reveal their commitments and look at how climate change is impacting each nation. And finally, we'll uncover the potential for solutions and change.

Subscribe here to receive email updates about the live broadcast event, guests and musical performances. In the meantime, here's a look at what's in store for 24 Hours of Reality: The Road Forward.

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