Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Adidas Unveils 3D-Printed Shoe Made From Plastic Ocean Waste

Climate
Adidas Unveils 3D-Printed Shoe Made From Plastic Ocean Waste

Building on their current partnership, Adidas and Parley for the Oceans announced the concept for a shoe made almost entirely from ocean waste. Adidas and Parley, an organization fighting to stop ocean pollution worldwide, made the announcement in conjunction with the COP21 Paris climate talks.

“World leaders forging an agreement is wonderful, but we shouldn’t need to be told to do the right thing. The industry can't afford to wait for directions any longer. Together with the network of Parley for the Oceans we have started taking action and creating new sustainable materials and innovations for athletes," said Eric Liedtke, adidas Group Executive Board member responsible for Global Brands. "The 3D-printed Ocean Plastic shoe midsole stands for how we can set new industry standards if we start questioning the reason to be of what we create.”

The upper part of the shoe is made with ocean plastic and the midsole is 3D-printed using recycled polyester and gill nets, a wall of netting used to catch fish. Last month, Adidas introduced Futurecraft 3D, which launched the company's efforts in 3D printing technology.

“2015 is our year, the year of the oceans: the ocean movement successfully brought the cause onto the COP21 agenda in Paris," said Cyrill Gutsch, founder of Parley for the Oceans. "Protecting life underwater became the 14th development goal of the United Nations.”

“With a framework of political goodwill in place, it is the right moment to transform words into action," he added. "Therefore, Parley in Paris is all about updating knowledge, sharing visions, fine-tuning strategies, creating concepts and forging collaborations in order to kickstart change."

As for when you can get your hands on a pair of these shoes, that remains to be seen. "We haven’t figured everything out yet but we continue to move forward,” Liedtke said. "It’s more a statement of intent of what we hope to do and a challenge for us to make it.”

However, another one of their eco shoes, which they unveiled at the UN in June, will be available for purchase in April. "Boasting an upper made from yarns and filaments reclaimed from ocean waste and illegal deep-sea gill nets," according to WWD, the shoe will be available in about 1,000 select Adidas stores.

YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

Interactive Map: 50,000 Wind Turbines Generate One-Third of America’s Green Energy

Boyan Slat One Step Closer to Launching World’s Largest Ocean Plastic Cleanup

Solar Powered ‘Farm from a Box’: Everything You Need to Run an Off-Grid Farm

Underwater Vertical Seaweed Farm Restores Our Oceans While Providing Food and Fuel Source

A dugong, also called a sea cow, swims with golden pilot jacks near Marsa Alam, Egypt, Red Sea. Alexis Rosenfeld / Getty Images

In 2010, world leaders agreed to 20 targets to protect Earth's biodiversity over the next decade. By 2020, none of them had been met. Now, the question is whether the world can do any better once new targets are set during the meeting of the UN Convention on Biodiversity in Kunming, China later this year.

Read More Show Less

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

President Joe Biden signs executive orders in the State Dining Room at the White House on Jan. 22, 2021 in Washington, DC. Jabin Botsford / The Washington Post via Getty Images

By Andrew Rosenberg

The first 24 hours of the administration of President Joe Biden were filled not only with ceremony, but also with real action. Executive orders and other directives were quickly signed. More actions have followed. All consequential. Many provide a basis for not just undoing actions of the previous administration, but also making real advances in public policy to protect public health, safety, and the environment.

Read More Show Less

Trending

Melting ice forms a lake on free-floating ice jammed into the Ilulissat Icefjord during unseasonably warm weather on July 30, 2019 near Ilulissat, Greenland. Sean Gallup / Getty Images

A first-of-its-kind study has examined the satellite record to see how the climate crisis is impacting all of the planet's ice.

Read More Show Less
Probiotic rich foods. bit245 / iStock / Getty Images Plus

By Ana Maldonado-Contreras

Takeaways

  • Your gut is home to trillions of bacteria that are vital for keeping you healthy.
  • Some of these microbes help to regulate the immune system.
  • New research, which has not yet been peer-reviewed, shows the presence of certain bacteria in the gut may reveal which people are more vulnerable to a more severe case of COVID-19.

You may not know it, but you have an army of microbes living inside of you that are essential for fighting off threats, including the virus that causes COVID-19.

Read More Show Less
Michael Mann photo inset by Joshua Yospyn.

By Jeff Masters, Ph.D.

The New Climate War: the fight to take back our planet is the latest must-read book by leading climate change scientist and communicator Michael Mann of Penn State University.

Read More Show Less