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Adidas Unveils 3D-Printed Shoe Made From Plastic Ocean Waste

Climate

Building on their current partnership, Adidas and Parley for the Oceans announced the concept for a shoe made almost entirely from ocean waste. Adidas and Parley, an organization fighting to stop ocean pollution worldwide, made the announcement in conjunction with the COP21 Paris climate talks.

“World leaders forging an agreement is wonderful, but we shouldn’t need to be told to do the right thing. The industry can't afford to wait for directions any longer. Together with the network of Parley for the Oceans we have started taking action and creating new sustainable materials and innovations for athletes," said Eric Liedtke, adidas Group Executive Board member responsible for Global Brands. "The 3D-printed Ocean Plastic shoe midsole stands for how we can set new industry standards if we start questioning the reason to be of what we create.”

The upper part of the shoe is made with ocean plastic and the midsole is 3D-printed using recycled polyester and gill nets, a wall of netting used to catch fish. Last month, Adidas introduced Futurecraft 3D, which launched the company's efforts in 3D printing technology.

“2015 is our year, the year of the oceans: the ocean movement successfully brought the cause onto the COP21 agenda in Paris," said Cyrill Gutsch, founder of Parley for the Oceans. "Protecting life underwater became the 14th development goal of the United Nations.”

“With a framework of political goodwill in place, it is the right moment to transform words into action," he added. "Therefore, Parley in Paris is all about updating knowledge, sharing visions, fine-tuning strategies, creating concepts and forging collaborations in order to kickstart change."

As for when you can get your hands on a pair of these shoes, that remains to be seen. "We haven’t figured everything out yet but we continue to move forward,” Liedtke said. "It’s more a statement of intent of what we hope to do and a challenge for us to make it.”

However, another one of their eco shoes, which they unveiled at the UN in June, will be available for purchase in April. "Boasting an upper made from yarns and filaments reclaimed from ocean waste and illegal deep-sea gill nets," according to WWD, the shoe will be available in about 1,000 select Adidas stores.

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