Quantcast

Adidas Unveils 3D-Printed Shoe Made From Plastic Ocean Waste

Climate

Building on their current partnership, Adidas and Parley for the Oceans announced the concept for a shoe made almost entirely from ocean waste. Adidas and Parley, an organization fighting to stop ocean pollution worldwide, made the announcement in conjunction with the COP21 Paris climate talks.

“World leaders forging an agreement is wonderful, but we shouldn’t need to be told to do the right thing. The industry can't afford to wait for directions any longer. Together with the network of Parley for the Oceans we have started taking action and creating new sustainable materials and innovations for athletes," said Eric Liedtke, adidas Group Executive Board member responsible for Global Brands. "The 3D-printed Ocean Plastic shoe midsole stands for how we can set new industry standards if we start questioning the reason to be of what we create.”

The upper part of the shoe is made with ocean plastic and the midsole is 3D-printed using recycled polyester and gill nets, a wall of netting used to catch fish. Last month, Adidas introduced Futurecraft 3D, which launched the company's efforts in 3D printing technology.

“2015 is our year, the year of the oceans: the ocean movement successfully brought the cause onto the COP21 agenda in Paris," said Cyrill Gutsch, founder of Parley for the Oceans. "Protecting life underwater became the 14th development goal of the United Nations.”

“With a framework of political goodwill in place, it is the right moment to transform words into action," he added. "Therefore, Parley in Paris is all about updating knowledge, sharing visions, fine-tuning strategies, creating concepts and forging collaborations in order to kickstart change."

As for when you can get your hands on a pair of these shoes, that remains to be seen. "We haven’t figured everything out yet but we continue to move forward,” Liedtke said. "It’s more a statement of intent of what we hope to do and a challenge for us to make it.”

However, another one of their eco shoes, which they unveiled at the UN in June, will be available for purchase in April. "Boasting an upper made from yarns and filaments reclaimed from ocean waste and illegal deep-sea gill nets," according to WWD, the shoe will be available in about 1,000 select Adidas stores.

YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

Interactive Map: 50,000 Wind Turbines Generate One-Third of America’s Green Energy

Boyan Slat One Step Closer to Launching World’s Largest Ocean Plastic Cleanup

Solar Powered ‘Farm from a Box’: Everything You Need to Run an Off-Grid Farm

Underwater Vertical Seaweed Farm Restores Our Oceans While Providing Food and Fuel Source

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

With well over a billion cars worldwide, electric vehicles are still only a small percentage. An economist from the University of Michigan Energy Institute says that is likely to change. Maskot / Getty Images

In 2018, there were about 5 million electric cars on the road globally. It sounds like a large number, but with well over a billion cars worldwide, electric vehicles are still only a small percentage.

Read More
Nestlé is accelerating its efforts to bring functional, safe and environmentally friendly packaging solutions to the market and to address the global challenge of plastic packaging waste. Nestlé / Flickr / CC BY-NC-ND 2.0

Nestlé, the world's largest food company, said it will invest up to $2 billion to address the plastic waste crisis that it is largely responsible for.

Read More
Sponsored
Determining the effects of media on people's lives requires knowledge of what people are actually seeing and doing on those screens. Vertigo3d / iStock / Getty Images Plus

By Byron Reeves, Nilam Ram and Thomas N. Robinson

There's a lot of talk about digital media. Increasing screen time has created worries about media's impacts on democracy, addiction, depression, relationships, learning, health, privacy and much more. The effects are frequently assumed to be huge, even apocalyptic.

Read More
Indigenous people of various ethnic groups protest calling for demarcation of lands during the closing of the 'Red January - Indigenous Blood', in Paulista Avenue, in São Paulo, Brazil, Jan. 31, 2019. Cris Faga / NurPhoto / Getty Images

By Raphael Tsavkko Garcia

Rarely has something so precious fallen into such unsafe hands. Since Jair Bolsonaro took the Brazilian presidency in 2019, the Amazon, which makes up 10 percent of our planet's biodiversity and absorbs an estimated 5 percent of global carbon emissions, has been hit with a record number of fires and unprecedented deforestation.

Read More
Microsoft's main campus in Redmond, Washington on May 12, 2017. GLENN CHAPMAN / AFP via Getty Images

Microsoft announced ambitious new plans to become carbon negative by 2030 and then go one step further and remove by 2050 all the carbon it has emitted since the company was founded in 1975, according to a company press release.

Read More