Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Actress Q'orianka Kilcher Joins Seven-Day Amazon Action

Actress Q'orianka Kilcher Joins Seven-Day Amazon Action

Greenpeace International

Actress and human rights activist Q'orianka Kilcher has climbed the anchor chain of a cargo ship in Brazil to protest the invasion of indigenous tribal land and illegal logging in the Amazon rainforest. She sat 20 feet above the water on a makeshift platform.

The 22 year-old is known for her role as Pocahontas in Terence Malik’s 2006 Oscar-nominated The New World, in which she co-starred with Colin Farrell. She also recently appeared alongside Cuba Gooding, Jr. in ABC’s “Firelight." Farrell recently contacted Kilcher to send his support for her work in the Amazon.

Q'orianka is currently stopping the “Clipper Hope” from entering port and loading 31,000 tonnes of pig iron, a key ingredient in the steel making process. New Greenpeace research shows how pig iron is helping to destroy the Amazon rainforest and even contributing to slave labor in the region. The resulting steel is bought by global car companies for use in U.S. factories.

Speaking from the anchor chain, Kilcher said:

“Things like slavery and illegal logging belong in the history books, but sadly they’re still a problem for people in modern Brazil. I’m sitting on this anchor chain with my fellow activist Leonor because young people like us around the world will inherit the problems that the older generation has left behind.

“People living in the forest are having their home destroyed just to shave a few cents off the price of a new car. It’s time for companies like Ford and GM to get a grip on this problem, and for the Brazilian President to show that she is committed to protecting the Amazon," she said.

Brazilian President Dilma Rousseff is currently considering whether to veto changes to the country’s ‘forest code’, which scientists and environmentalists say would lead to an upsurge in deforestation in the Amazon. She has until this Friday to make a decision. Greenpeace and many other groups are urging her to veto the entire new text.

Pig iron is produced by heating iron ore in giant blast furnaces, which require huge amounts of wood charcoal to operate. A new Greenpeace report called “Driving Destruction in the Amazon” shows how this charcoal is often sourced from rainforest trees and is produced using slave labor. Uncontacted tribes such as the Awa are also under serious threat from the trade.

The pig iron is then exported in ships like the Clipper Hope to the U.S., where it is eventually converted into steel and bought by some of the biggest carmakers in the world including Ford, GM, Mercedes and BMW.

Q’orianka climbed the anchor chain with 27 year-old Brazilian activist Leonor Cristina Silva Souza after visiting the crew of the Greenpeace ship “Rainbow Warrior,” which is stationed nearby. She donned a blue all-weather suit before climbing a small unsupported ladder up to the heavy anchor chain. Greenpeace activists have now occupied the chain for seven consecutive days.

From the Rainbow Warrior ship nearby Greenpeace Campaign Director Paulo Adario said:

“We are honored that Q’orianka has joined us in this blockade. She is helping Greenpeace Brazil to show that despite the positive image that this country has built over the years, much still needs to be done. The first step is for President Dilma to veto the disastrous new forest code this week.”

For more information, click here.

UN Secretary General Antonio Guterres delivers a video speech at the high-level meeting of the 46th session of the United Nations Human Rights Council UNHRC in Geneva, Switzerland on Feb. 22, 2021. Xinhua / Zhang Cheng via Getty Images

By Anke Rasper

"Today's interim report from the UNFCCC is a red alert for our planet," said UN Secretary General Antonio Guterres.

The report, released Friday, looks at the national climate efforts of 75 states that have already submitted their updated "nationally determined contributions," or NDCs. The countries included in the report are responsible for about 30% of the world's global greenhouse gas emissions.

Read More Show Less

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

New Delhi's smog is particularly thick, increasing the risk of vehicle accidents. SAJJAD HUSSAIN / AFP via Getty Images

India's New Delhi has been called the "world air pollution capital" for its high concentrations of particulate matter that make it harder for its residents to breathe and see. But one thing has puzzled scientists, according to The Guardian. Why does New Delhi see more blinding smogs than other polluted Asian cities, such as Beijing?

Read More Show Less

Trending

A bridge over the Delaware river connects New Hope, Pennsylvania with Lambertville, New Jersey. Richard T. Nowitz / Getty Images

In a historic move, the Delaware River Basin Commission (DRBC) voted Thursday to ban hydraulic fracking in the region. The ban was supported by all four basin states — New Jersey, Delaware, Pennsylvania and New York — putting a permanent end to hydraulic fracking for natural gas along the 13,539-square-mile basin, The Philadelphia Inquirer reported.

Read More Show Less
Woodpecker

Colombia is one of the world's largest producers of coffee, and yet also one of the most economically disadvantaged. According to research by the national statistic center DANE, 35% of the population in Columbia lives in monetary poverty, compared to an estimated 11% in the U.S., according to census data. This has led to a housing insecurity issue throughout the country, one which construction company Woodpecker is working hard to solve.

Read More Show Less
A 3-hour special film by EarthxTV calls for protection of the Amazon and its indigenous populations. EarthxTV.org

To save the planet, we must save the Amazon rainforest. To save the rainforest, we must save its indigenous peoples. And to do that, we must demarcate their land.

Read More Show Less