Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Help Support EcoWatch

Activists Shut Down UK's Gas Power Station for One Week

Climate
Activists Shut Down UK's Gas Power Station for One Week

Oil Change International

By Andy Rowell

This morning the last two protestors occupying the chimney of a huge gas power station in the UK intend to end their protest having shut the new power station down for a week.

This morning the last two protesters from the No Dash for Gas group occupying the chimney of a huge gas power station in the UK intend to end their protest having shut the new power station down for a week.

They and other protesters who have already come down have been protesting against the UK government’s latest “Dash for Gas.”

They have been occupying the West Burton gas power station’s chimney in Nottinghamshire, England, operated by EDF with a camp outside and inside the 80 meter high chimney. West Burton is the UK’s newest gas plant and the first of 20 new gas-fired power stations planned by the government.

The protest is the longest power station occupation ever in the UK and the only one in the UK that has actually managed to shut down operations.

In all, sixteen people occupied two of the chimneys at the site, including Ewa Jasiewicz, who wrote last week:

It’s pretty scary hanging inside the chimney on a portaledge ... We’re doing this because the gas plant, which is still being constructed by its operator, EDF, is one of the first in a new dash for gas that has to be stopped. The government and the big energy companies want to build as many as 20 new gas power stations, which would leave the UK dependent on this highly polluting and increasingly expensive fuel for decades to come.”

Indeed the activists have stopped 10,000 tons of CO2 from entering the atmosphere by their protest.

Yesterday the Observer reported how the amount of power expected to be generated from gas by 2030 has quadrupled in the last year, according to official projections. Official government data shows the amount of power being generated from gas by 2030 is expected to increase from 8 gigawatts in its 2011 projections to 31 gigawatts in the same projections 12 months later.

Even some Conservative Members of Parliament (MP) are warning against this. “The idea that unabated gas is a long-term solution is mistaken,” argues Tim Yeo, the Conservative MP and chairman of the Energy and Climate Change Select Committee. “There is a significant risk in being very dependent on gas in the 2020s because the world price may be much higher than it is now.”

But others warn that it is not just price we should be worried about. Caroline Flint, Labour’s shadow energy secretary, said: “There is a real risk the government’s dash for gas will blow a hole through our climate change targets, undermine investment in clean energy and leave households vulnerable to price shocks and rising energy bills.”

Indeed Damian Carrington from the Guardian argues that “unless you don’t believe climate change is a threat, or you do believe in the UK shale gas fantasy, the dash for gas looks dumb.”

It looks especially dumb in light of Hurricane Sandy, yet another warning from a warming world. The protesters have made the connection too. “Hurricane Sandy is being directly linked to climate change, which is directly linked to the amount of fossil fuels, like gas, that we burn. Being up here in light of the damage we’re seeing from the hurricane feels like the most responsible thing we could be doing,” said Jasiewicz.

She continues by arguing that “We believe that another future is possible—one that puts the needs of people and the environment ahead of big corporations and profit.”

Visit EcoWatch’s CLIMATE CHANGE and ENERGY pages for more related news on this topic.

 

A meteorologist monitors weather in NOAA's Center for Weather and Climate Prediction on July 2, 2013 in Riverdale, Maryland. Mark Wilson / Getty Images

The Trump White House is now set to appoint two climate deniers to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) in one month.

Read More Show Less

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

A plastic bag caught in a tree in New Jersey's Palisades Park. James Leynse / Stone / Getty Images

New Jersey is one step closer to passing what environmental advocates say is the strongest anti-plastic legislation in the nation.

Read More Show Less

Trending

Did you know that nearly 30% of adults do, or will, suffer from a sleep condition at some point in their life? Anyone who has experienced disruptions in their sleep is familiar with the havoc that it can wreak on your body and mind. Lack of sleep, for one, can lead to anxiety and lethargy in the short-term. In the long-term, sleep deprivation can lead to obesity, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease.

Fortunately, there are proven natural supplements that can reduce insomnia and improve quality sleep for the better. CBD oil, in particular, has been scientifically proven to promote relaxing and fulfilling sleep. Best of all, CBD is non-addictive, widely available, and affordable for just about everyone to enjoy. For these very reasons, we have put together a comprehensive guide on the best CBD oil for sleep. Our goal is to provide objective, transparent information about CBD products so you are an informed buyer.

Read More Show Less
Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi (D-CA) talks to reporters during her weekly news conference at the U.S. Capitol Visitors Center on Sept. 18, 2020 in Washington, DC. Chip Somodevilla / Getty Images

The House of Representatives passed a sweeping bill to boost clean energy while phasing out the use of coolants in air conditioners and refrigerators that are known pollutants and contribute to the climate crisis, as the AP reported.

Read More Show Less
Gov. Jay Inslee of Washington comforts Marsha Maus, 75, whose home was destroyed during California's deadly 2018 wildfires, on March 11, 2019 in Agoura Hills, California. Mel Melcon / Los Angeles Times / Getty Images

By Governor Jay Inslee

Climate Week this year coincides with clear skies in Washington state for the first time in almost two weeks.

In just a few days in early September, Washington state saw enough acres burned – more than 600,000 – to reach our second-worst fire season on record. Our worst fire season came only five years ago. Wildfires aren't new to the west, but their scope and danger today is unlike anything firefighters have seen. People up and down the West Coast – young and old, in rural areas and in cities – were choking on smoke for days on end, trapped in their homes.

Fires like these are becoming the norm, not the exception.

Read More Show Less

Support Ecowatch