Quantcast

ACTION: High Stakes in the High Seas

Greenpeace USA

More than 90 percent of the world's largest predator fish are gone. Others are in serious trouble—including key species of tuna.

It's a shocking figure. And if something isn't done soon, one of the planet's major food sources could disappear for good. Nowhere is this problem more urgent than in the Western and Central Pacific Ocean.

Major U.S. companies like Chicken of the Sea get most of their tuna from this part of the world. Almost all of it is caught by Asian owned boats using destructive fishing practices such as Fish Aggregating Devices (FADs) that kill a lot more than just tuna. Our future is at stake here.

That's why the Western and Central Pacific Fisheries Commission (WCPFC) meeting in Guam next week is so important. Leaders there have a chance to get oceans management right. The U.S. delegation can play a huge role there, but they're only going to do it if the American public speaks up.

Show your support for the U.S. delegation in Guam by signing our petition urging them to protect the tuna populations of the Pacific Ocean and not the narrow interests of the tuna fishing industry.

Greenpeace is teaming up with an international coalition of groups on this petition. We're aiming to contribute at least 35,000 signatures in the next two days to the overall effort. Your voice is going to be key to making that happen.

Time is seriously running out here. This meeting is one of the last major opportunities for world leaders to do what's right for our oceans before it is too late. For too long, the quarterly earnings of billion dollar corporations have dictated international policies.

Together we can change that and save these tuna species along with the thousands of sharks and other creatures killed by destructive fishing practices every year.

Let the U.S. delegation to the WCPFC know that you're counting on them to do the right thing and protect the Pacific tuna populations for future generations.

For more information, click here.

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

Chinese cobra (Naja atra) with hood spread. Briston / Wikimedia, CC BY-SA

By Haitao Guo, Guangxiang "George" Luo and Shou-Jiang Gao

Snakes – the Chinese krait and the Chinese cobra – may be the original source of the newly discovered coronavirus that has triggered an outbreak of a deadly infectious respiratory illness in China this winter.

Read More
Coca-Cola says it will not phase out its plastic bottles. Roberto Machado Noa / LightRocket / Getty Images

Despite its status as the world's No. 1 corporate plastic polluter, Coca-Cola won't be phasing out its single-use plastic bottles anytime soon.

Read More
Sponsored
Myakka River State Park outside of Sarasota, Florida on Dec. 30, 2016. The park is a small preserve of rare protected habitat along Florida's Gulf Coast, a region that has seen intense development and population growth. Andrew Lichtenstein / Corbis via Getty Images

Today, the Trump administration will finalize its replacement for the Obama-era Waters of the United States (WOTUS) rule in a move that will strip protections from more than half of the nation's wetlands and allow landowners to dump pesticides into waterways, or build over wetlands, for the first time in decades.

Read More
"It would be great to see all the candidates join Elizabeth Warren in taking the No Big Ag Money Pledge," said Citizens Regeneration Lobby's Alexis Baden-Mayer. Peter Blanchard / Flickr / ric (CC BY 2.0)

By Andrea Germanos

Food system justice and environmental advocates on Wednesday urged all Democratic presidential hopefuls to follow in the footsteps of Sen. Elizabeth Warren in signing a pledge rejecting campaign cash from food and agribusiness corporations.

Read More
A new study shows the impact Native Americans had on landscapes was "small" compared to what followed by Europeans. The findings provide important takeaway for conservation in New England today, seen above in a view of areas surrounding Rangeley Lakes in Maine. Cappi Thompson / Moment / Getty Images

There's a theory going around that Native Americans actively managed the land the lived on, using controlled burns to clear forests. It turns out that theory is wrong. New research shows that Native Americans barely altered the landscape at all. It was the Europeans who did that, as ZME Science reported.

Read More