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ACTION: Help Protect Hawaiian Monk Seals

Center for Biological Diversity

This is an important time for Hawaiian monk seals. Overall, the population is perilously close to extinction, declining from about 1,100 seals. However, as seal numbers decline on Hawaii's northwestern islands, populations on the main islands are growing, and these seals are healthier.

The main islands could be a refuge for the seals, and critical habitat protections can help ensure they have a place to call home—but sadly, Hawaii's officials are hearing vocal opposition to habitat protections and other recovery actions that could save our seals. These concerns are fueled by false statements that monk seals are not native to Hawaii and that the public will lose access to beaches if protections are granted.

To set the record straight—Protecting seals does not close beaches, but it could require limits on coastal development and pollution that would benefit seals and other beachgoers alike.

We have to make a strong show of support for monk seal recovery now. Fill out the form to let Hawaii's officials know you care about monk seals and believe they must not be allowed to go extinct.

For more information, click here.

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