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EcoWatch is a leading online environmental news company, publishing timely stories every day for a healthier planet and life. We are rapidly growing, reaching millions of readers each month through original writing from our contributors and reposts from partner organizations. EcoWatch informs its audience with essential science-based news on a wide range of topics including climate change, energy, oceans, animals, food, politics and health.

Stay connected to EcoWatch by subscribing to our Top News of the Day, liking us on Facebook and following us on Twitter and Instagram.

Team

Tara Bracco

About Tara

Tara joined EcoWatch as managing editor in April 2018. Her work has appeared in local and national publications including the Huffington Post, Cosmopolitan, American Theatre, BUST, Brooklyn Based and Clamor. She was a segment producer for Tina Brown Live Media and a freelance web producer for Condé Nast Traveler. She holds a master's degree from CUNY Graduate School of Journalism.

In addition to her media work, Tara has worked extensively in the nonprofit sector. As the founder of Poetic People Power, she has produced spoken word shows in New York City on issues including global warming and the global water crisis, and she's been featured in O, The Oprah Magazine, Time Out New York and The Brooklyn Rail. She also cofounded the international nonprofit The Project Solution, which funds water and sanitation projects in developing countries. She serves on the advisory board of The Arctic Cycle, a nonprofit theatre fostering dialogue about climate change.

Chris McDermott

About Chris

Chris is a news editor for EcoWatch. He has a Ph.D. in English from the University of Georgia and a B.S. from Cornell University, where he studied ecology and psychology.

He was a staff writer for The Atlanta Journal and Constitution, and a contributor to Flagpole Magazine and Georgia Magazine.

Born in New York, he enjoys bicycling, hiking, swimming, writing and music, mathematics and nature.

Irma Omerhodzic

About Irma

Weekend associate editor Irma Omerhodzic joined the EcoWatch team in August 2015 as an editorial assistant after graduating from the E.W. Scripps School of Journalism at Ohio University with a bachelor's degree. She was then EcoWatch's associate editor until August 2019. Since August, Irma has been earning her master's degree from the E.W. Scripps School.

Born in Bosnia & Herzegovina, Irma moved to the U.S. in 1997 after having been refuged to Germany as a result of the Yugoslavian civil war.

She is passionate about coming together as a collective unit for the planet, in order to restore Earth back to its natural state of balance and unity. In her spare time, Irma enjoys hikes with her dog Myla, riding her bike and listening to podcasts.

Olivia Rosane

About Olivia

Olivia is a contributing reporter for EcoWatch. She has been writing on the internet for more than five years and has covered social movements for YES! Magazine and ecological themes for Real Life. For her recent master's in Art and Politics at Goldsmiths, University of London, she completed a creative dissertation imagining sustainable communities surviving in post-climate-change London.

She has lived in New York, Vermont, London, and Seattle, but wherever she lives, she likes to go to the greenest place she can find, take long, meandering walks, and write poems about its wildflowers. Follow her on Twitter @orosane.

Jordan Davidson

About Jordan

Jordan Davidson is a freelance journalist. His work has appeared in many local and national publications including the Wall Street Journal, Psychology Today, Science Friday, Prevention, NRDC.org, and many others. He holds a bachelors degree from Brown University and a masters from the City University of New York's School of Journalism.

Jordan spent years as an ESL teacher in New York City public schools before becoming a journalist. He is an avid traveler, hiker, cyclist and hobby farmer.

Madison Dapcevich

About Madison

Madison is a freelance reporter at EcoWatch. Based in San Francisco, she works full-time as a journalist for IFLScience. She spent a few years working on Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C. before reporting throughout the Rocky Mountains, where she received an M.A. in Environmental Science and Natural Resource Journalism from the University of Montana, as well as a graduate certificate in Natural Resource Conflict Resolution. She is also a 2019 Science Communication Fellow with the E/V Nautilus.

Tiffany Duong

About Tiffany

Tiffany is a freelance reporter at EcoWatch and an avid ocean advocate. She holds degrees from UCLA and the University of Pennsylvania Carey Law School and is an Al Gore Climate Reality Leader and student member of The Explorer's Club.

She spent years as a renewable energy lawyer in L.A. before moving to the Amazon to conduct conservation fieldwork (and revamp her life). She eventually landed in the Florida Keys as a scientific scuba diver and field reporter and writes about the oceans/climate/environment from her slice of paradise. When she's not underwater, she can be found on her yoga mat or planning her next adventure. Follow her on Twitter/Instagram @lilicedt.

James Wakefield

About James

James is EcoWatch's social media intern.

He lives in the UK and is a graduate from the University of Southampton where he studies Environmental Sciences (BSc). After volunteering with Young Friends of the Earth UK, he currently works as a social media officer for the UK charity Woodland Trust. He is also an associate of the Institution of Environmental Sciences.

An avid eco-socialist, he co-runs a blog on WordPress and can be found on Twitter @S0cialEcologist.

RebelMouse

About RebelMouse

RebelMouse builds technology that enables companies to succeed in the world of distributed publishing. By using either our groundbreaking Distributed Content Management System (DCMS) for natively-social publishing or by extending their existing CMS, our customers launch fully-distributed web properties in a matter of days. At the core of the platform are smart distribution tools which help to increase organic reach on social media. RebelMouse technology makes it easy to find and grow relationships with social influencers and connect content with its maximum audience.

Board

Theodore P. Janulis

About Theodore

Ted, EcoWatch's co-executive chairman, partner and board member, has worked for 27 years in the financial services industry. He graduated from Harvard College in 1981 and received his MBA from Columbia Business School in 1985. He was the 1981 recipient of the Rolex/Our World Underwater Scholarship, enabling him to work and travel for a year with ocean scientists and explorers.

Ted's past/present board affiliations include the Ronald McDonald House of New York City, Zawadi By Youth, Livingston Ripley Waterfowl Sanctuary and The Explorers Club. Ted has also served on the advisory council of the Center for Biodiversity and Conservation at the American Museum of Natural History.

Thomas O'Sullivan

About Thomas

Tom O'Sullivan is co-executive chairman, partner and board member of EcoWatch. Tom has more than 20 years of business management, finance and accounting experience. He has held several senior management roles including Treasurer and Chief Financial Officer at a National Depository Institution and Chief Financial Officer of the mortgage business at a Wall Street firm.

Tom received a BBA from Hofstra University and an MBA in Finance and International Business from New York University.

Kerry Watterson

About Kerry

Kerry has more than 25 years of business leadership and capital markets experience, having graduated from the U.S. Coast Guard Academy in 1978. He received an MBA with a major in Finance from Columbia University's Graduate School of Business in 1985.

Prior to graduate school, Kerry served on active duty for five years, in operational leadership and staff positions, as a commissioned officer in the U.S. Coast Guard.

In addition to serving on the EcoWatch board, he is a director of Rivergate Foundation and ICA-Art Conservation, and a member of the investment committee of The HELP Foundation, Inc. He is a past member of the boards of The Music Settlement – Cleveland, The U. S. Coast Guard Academy Alumni Association, The Cleveland Rowing Foundation and The MG Car Club, Washington, DC Centre.

The Board members above collectively are the majority owners of EcoWatch.

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

Much of Eastern Oklahoma, including most of Tulsa, remains an Indian reservation, the Supreme Court ruled on Thursday. JustTulsa / CC BY 2.0

Much of Eastern Oklahoma, including most of Tulsa, remains an Indian reservation, the Supreme Court ruled on Thursday.

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The Firefly Watch project is among the options for aspiring citizen scientists to join. Mike Lewinski / Wikimedia Commons / CC by 2.0

By Tiffany Means

Summer and fall are great seasons to enjoy the outdoors. But if you're already spending extra time outside because of the COVID-19 pandemic, you may be out of ideas on how to make fresh-air activities feel special. Here are a few suggestions to keep both adults and children entertained and educated in the months ahead, many of which can be done from the comfort of one's home or backyard.

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People sit at the bar of a restaurant in Austin, Texas, on June 26, 2020. Texas Governor Greg Abbott ordered bars to be closed by noon on June 26 and for restaurants to be reduced to 50% occupancy. Coronavirus cases in Texas spiked after being one of the first states to begin reopening. SERGIO FLORES / AFP via Getty Images

The coronavirus may linger in the air in crowded indoor spaces, spreading from one person to the next, the World Health Organization acknowledged on Thursday, as The New York Times reported. The announcement came just days after 239 scientists wrote a letter urging the WHO to consider that the novel coronavirus is lingering in indoor spaces and infecting people, as EcoWatch reported.

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A never-before-documented frog species has been discovered in the Peruvian highlands and named Phrynopus remotum. Germán Chávez

By Angela Nicoletti

The eastern slopes of the Andes Mountains in central Perú are among the most remote places in the world.

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Trending

Left: Lemurs in Madagascar on March 30, 2017. Mathias Appel / Flickr. Right: A North Atlantic right whale mother and calf. National Marine Fisheries Service

A new analysis by scientists at the Swiss-based International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) found that lemurs and the North Atlantic right whale are on the brink of extinction.

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Nobody knows exactly how much vitamin D a person actually needs. However, vitamin D is becoming increasingly popular. Colin Dunn / Flickr / CC by 2.0

By Julia Vergin

It is undisputed that vitamin D plays a role everywhere in the body and performs important functions. A severe vitamin D deficiency, which can occur at a level of 12 nanograms per milliliter of blood or less, leads to severe and painful bone deformations known as rickets in infants and young children and osteomalacia in adults. Unfortunately, this is where the scientific consensus ends.

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Trending

Data from a scientist measuring macroalgal communities in rocky shores in the Argentinean Patagonia would be added to the new system. Patricia Miloslavich / University of Delaware

Ocean scientists have been busy creating a global network to understand and measure changes in ocean life. The system will aggregate data from the oceans, climate and human activity to better inform sustainable marine management practices.

EcoWatch sat down with some of the scientists spearheading the collaboration to learn more.

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Authors of a new study warned Thursday that increasing carbon dioxide in the atmosphere is nearing a level not seen in 15 million years. Dawn Ellner / Flickr / CC by 2.0

By Jessica Corbett

As a United Nations agency released new climate projections showing that the world is on track in the next five years to hit or surpass a key limit of the Paris agreement, authors of a new study warned Thursday that increasing carbon dioxide in the atmosphere is nearing a level not seen in 15 million years.

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