Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

A Snapshot of Manufacturing Energy Use Across Ten Midwestern States

Energy

World Resources Institute

For the first time, new analysis reveals energy use and economic data by subsector for ten Midwestern states, laying the groundwork for increased industrial energy efficiency in the region. Developed by the World Resources Institute (WRI), with the Great Plains Institute, Midwestern Governors Association (MGA), and University of Illinois at Chicago’s Energy Resources Center, the working paper presents manufacturing energy use by subsector for Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Ohio, South Dakota, and Wisconsin.

The paper, “Midwest Manufacturing Snapshot: Energy Use and Efficiency Policies,” provides a summary of each state’s current policies to reduce energy-related costs and emissions.

“Our goal is to improve policymakers’ ability in the region to identify opportunities to reduce emissions, increase energy efficiency, and drive economic development,” said James Bradbury, senior associate at WRI and the lead author of the paper. “There is a real appetite for high-quality, detailed information regarding manufacturing energy use, and this paper provides a solid foundation for more informed policy choices.”

The Midwest economy relies on manufacturing more than any other U.S. region, but industry has been hit hard with job losses over the past decade. More recently, the manufacturing sector has been a key driver for creating jobs and reviving the economy. Companies in the region are increasingly looking at energy efficiency to become more productive and profitable, further stimulating economic growth and employment.

According to the paper, the Midwest accounted for 30 percent of total U.S. manufacturing activity in 2010. The paper shows that industrial activity consumes more energy than any other sector in the Midwest. And, for energy-intensive subsectors—such as iron and steel, cement, chemicals, and paperboard manufacturing—energy use can account for up to 16 percent of total costs, which has significant implications for companies’ bottom line.

“State governments are particularly well-positioned to identify and encourage opportunities for industrial energy efficiency investment,” said Jesse Heier, executive director of MGA. “This paper will help officials to better understand and identify opportunities for increasing industrial energy efficiency as part of an overall economic development strategy.”

Until now state-level energy use data have not been publicly available in sufficient detail to identify how much energy subsectors are using and where the biggest opportunities are. This paper changes that by presenting detailed manufacturing energy use and economic activity data at the subsector level.

“We are very pleased that a variety of stakeholders are seeing the promise of industrial energy efficiency to both economic growth and environmental sustainability,” says Lola Schoenrich, program director, Energy Efficiency and Low-carbon Electricity, the Great Plains Institute. “This paper is a great resource for policy makers, utilities, and businesses in the identification and development of best practices for each state in the region.”

The paper discusses emerging policy trends and presents summaries of manufacturing sector energy-use activity, as well as related policies for each state in the MGA.

The paper represents a new line of analysis by the WRI and provides a foundation for further research on industrial energy efficiency in the Midwest.

Read the full paper, including state-by-state analysis, by clicking here.

For more information, click here.

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

The recovery of elephant seals is one of the "signs of hope" that scientists say show the oceans can recover swiftly if we let them. NOAA / CC BY 2.0

The challenges facing the world's oceans are well known: plastic pollution could crowd out fish by 2050, and the climate crisis could wipe out coral reefs by 2100.

Read More Show Less
A schoolchildren crossing sign is seen in front of burned trees in Mallacoota, Australia on Jan. 15, 2020. Luis Ascui / Getty Images

By Bhiamie Williamson, Francis Markham and Jessica Weir

The catastrophic bushfire season is officially over, but governments, agencies and communities have failed to recognize the specific and disproportionate impact the fires have had on Aboriginal peoples.

Read More Show Less
Sponsored
Workers convert the Scottish Events Campus, where COP26 was to be held, into a field hospital to treat COVID-19 patients. ANDY BUCHANAN / AFP via Getty Images

The most important international climate talks since the Paris agreement was reached in 2015 have been delayed because of the coronavirus pandemic.

Read More Show Less
An aerial view of a crude oil storage facility of Caspian Pipeline Consortium (CPC) in the Krasnodar Territory. Vitaly Timkiv / TASS / Getty Images

Oil rigs around the world keep pulling crude oil out of the ground, but the global pandemic has sent shockwaves into the market. The supply is up, but demand has plummeted now that industry has ground to a halt, highways are empty, and airplanes are parked in hangars.

Read More Show Less
Examples (from left) of a lead pipe, a corroded steel pipe and a lead pipe treated with protective orthophosphate. U.S. EPA Region 5

Under an agreement negotiated by community groups — represented by NRDC and the Pennsylvania Utility Law Project — the Pittsburgh Water and Sewer Authority (PWSA) will remove thousands of lead water pipes by 2026 in order to address the chronically high lead levels in the city's drinking water and protect residents' health.

Read More Show Less