Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

A Life Less Toxic: Amy Smart and Carter Oosterhouse Visit Organic Mattress Factory Naturepedic

Business
A Life Less Toxic: Amy Smart and Carter Oosterhouse Visit Organic Mattress Factory Naturepedic

Right in my hometown of Chagrin Falls is the nation's leading certified organic mattress and accessories maker, Naturepedic. The company was founded more than a decade ago by environmental engineer Barry A. Cik after he realized he couldn't buy a nontoxic crib mattress for his soon-to-be born grandchild.

Featured in the debut episode of the webseries Great American Search for a Life Less Toxic, actress Amy Smart and Carter Oosterhouseare visit Cik to tour his Naturepedic organic mattress manufacturing plant, one of only two mattress manufacturing facilities in the U.S. independently certified organic and nontoxic to the Global Organic Textile Standard.

A longtime advocate of improved chemical regulations, Cik has been adamant from the inception of Naturepedic to focus on making healthier products, offering mattresses and accessories for babies, children and adults made without chemical flame retardants, phthalates and other toxic chemicals.

The Great American Search for a Life Less Toxic, which launched today, is produced by the Environmental Media Association (EMA), an organization leveraging the star power of Hollywood actors, producers, writers and other members of the entertainment industry to affect environmental change.

“We are so thrilled to launch our new webseries ‘A Life Less Toxic’ to showcase truly innovative companies and individuals who are making a difference in consumers’ lives,” said Debbie Levin, president of Environmental Media Association. “We knew we had to launch with Barry Cik and Naturepedic, because we spend almost a third of our lives in our beds, but how many of us think about the toxins in our standard mattresses? We hope this series will educate and inspire as we look for new ways to live healthier and environmentally friendly lives.”

YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

Can Organic Agriculture Reverse Climate Change?

Julia Roberts is Mother Nature

100+ Join Microsoft Calling for Action on Climate Change

An Edith's Checkerspot butterfly in Los Padres National Forest in Southern California. Patricia Marroquin / Moment / Getty Images

Butterflies across the U.S. West are disappearing, and now researchers say the climate crisis is largely to blame.

Read More Show Less

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

A wildfire burns in the Hollywood hills on July 19, 2016 in Hollywood, California. AaronP / Bauer-Griffin / GC Images

California faces another "critically dry year" according to state officials, and a destructive wildfire season looms on its horizon. But in a state that welcomes innovation, water efficacy approaches and drought management could replenish California, increasingly threatened by the climate's new extremes.

Read More Show Less

Trending

Wisdom is seen with her chick in Feb. 2021 at the Midway Atoll National Wildlife Refuge. Jon Brack / Friends of Midway Atoll National Wildlife Refuge / Flickr / CC 2.0

Wisdom the mōlī, or Laysan albatross, is the oldest wild bird known to science at the age of at least 70. She is also, as of February 1, a new mother.

Read More Show Less
Wind turbines in Norway. piola66 / E+ / Getty Images

By Hui Hu

Winter is supposed to be the best season for wind power – the winds are stronger, and since air density increases as the temperature drops, more force is pushing on the blades. But winter also comes with a problem: freezing weather.

Read More Show Less
Jaffa Port in Israel. theDOCK innovated the Israeli maritime space and kickstarted a boom in new technologies. Pixabay

While traditional investment in the ocean technology sector has been tentative, growth in Israeli maritime innovations has been exponential in the last few years, and environmental concern has come to the forefront.

Read More Show Less