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A Life Less Toxic: Amy Smart and Carter Oosterhouse Visit Organic Mattress Factory Naturepedic

Business

Right in my hometown of Chagrin Falls is the nation's leading certified organic mattress and accessories maker, Naturepedic. The company was founded more than a decade ago by environmental engineer Barry A. Cik after he realized he couldn't buy a nontoxic crib mattress for his soon-to-be born grandchild.

Featured in the debut episode of the webseries Great American Search for a Life Less Toxic, actress Amy Smart and Carter Oosterhouseare visit Cik to tour his Naturepedic organic mattress manufacturing plant, one of only two mattress manufacturing facilities in the U.S. independently certified organic and nontoxic to the Global Organic Textile Standard.

A longtime advocate of improved chemical regulations, Cik has been adamant from the inception of Naturepedic to focus on making healthier products, offering mattresses and accessories for babies, children and adults made without chemical flame retardants, phthalates and other toxic chemicals.

The Great American Search for a Life Less Toxic, which launched today, is produced by the Environmental Media Association (EMA), an organization leveraging the star power of Hollywood actors, producers, writers and other members of the entertainment industry to affect environmental change.

“We are so thrilled to launch our new webseries ‘A Life Less Toxic’ to showcase truly innovative companies and individuals who are making a difference in consumers’ lives,” said Debbie Levin, president of Environmental Media Association. “We knew we had to launch with Barry Cik and Naturepedic, because we spend almost a third of our lives in our beds, but how many of us think about the toxins in our standard mattresses? We hope this series will educate and inspire as we look for new ways to live healthier and environmentally friendly lives.”

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