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A Behind the Scenes Look at How Solar Energy Beat the Odds

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A Behind the Scenes Look at How Solar Energy Beat the Odds

Our industry has come a long way in shaping solar into a serious source for America's energy needs and we are in a major growth mode.

By 2020, solar will quadruple in size to nearly 100 gigawatts (GW) of total capacity from just more than 25 GW today. By then, more than $150 billion will have been pumped into our economy and enough solar will have been installed to power 20 million American homes.

Why will this happen? In large part it's because the Solar Energy Industries Association (SEIA) fought a successful battle to extend the solar investment tax credit (ITC) last December. Instead of allowing the ITC to drop down to 10 percent for commercial users and zero for residential users, SEIA pushed Congress to vote for a long-term extension.

Watch this new report to learn just how the solar industry beat the odds.

The industry isn't stopping with the pivotal ITC policy. Solar will make our nation proud and prosperous as a world leader in a new energy paradigm. A unified industry will be key in shepherding this exciting new era through.

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