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An orchard near Kettleman City in California's San Joaquin Valley on April 2, 2021. Frederic J. Brown / AFP via Getty Images

By Debra Perrone and Scott Jasechko

As the drought outlook for the Western U.S. becomes increasingly bleak, attention is turning once again to groundwater – literally, water stored in the ground. It is Earth's most widespread and reliable source of fresh water, but it's not limitless.

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Food dyes in products such as breakfast cereals, juice and soft drinks, frozen dairy desserts, candies, and icings were linked to adverse neurobehavioral outcomes in children including inattentiveness, hyperactivity, and restlessness. bhofack2 / Getty Images

By Nate Seltenrich

Synthetic dyes used as colorants in many common foods and drinks can negatively affect attention and activity in children, according to a comprehensive review of existing evidence published this month by the California Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment (OEHHA).

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Devon Gailey

CBD oil is one dietary supplement where "organic" labels are very important to consumers. Learn about the importance of organic hemp oil, why it's better for the environment, and which CBD companies actually make trustworthy products with sustainable farming processes. Use our curated list to find the best organic CBD oil that's better for you and the environment.

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Spiders remain under-represented across the world's endangered-species conservation plans. karthik photography / Getty Images

By John R. Platt

Spiders need our help, and we may need to overcome our biases and fears to make that happen.

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A bulldozer moves scrap metal at General Iron Industries in Chicago, Illinois. Raymond Boyd / Michael Ochs Archives / Getty Images

Chicago mayor Lori Lightfoot indefinitely delayed a permitting decision on the relocation of a highly polluting metal shredding and recycling facility after the U.S. EPA said doing so could violate the civil rights of Black and Latino people who live there.

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Burning forest in Rondonia in 2020. Fabio Nascimento

Deforestation in the Brazilian Amazon surged during the month of April, ending a streak of three consecutive months where forest clearing had been lower than the prior year. The rise in deforestation came despite a high-profile pledge from Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro to rein in deforestation in Earth's largest rainforest.

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The Department of Transportation declared a state of emergency for 17 states plus DC on Sunday to help ease fuel shortages. Pramote Polyamate / Getty Images

The largest U.S. fuel pipeline remains shut down following a massive ransomware cyberattack on Friday.

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EcoWatch joins Fabien Cousteau to remove marine debris in the Florida Keys and talk about the future of the oceans. Tiffany Duong / Ocean Rebels

Much of what we've been able to learn about the underwater world has built on the legacy of underwater explorer and pioneer Jacques Yves Cousteau. In 1943, Cousteau invented the aqua-lung, which completed his self-contained underwater breathing apparatus (SCUBA). This technology forever changed how humans interact with the blue world and remains the precursor of modern-day scuba diving equipment.

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A humpback whale, one of the species affected by the Pacific marine heat wave, breaches in Kenai Fjords National Park in the Gulf of Alaska. Kaitlin Thoreson / National Park Service

By Hannah Thomasy

From 2014 to 2016, the Gulf of Alaska experienced the worst marine heat wave of the decade. From single-celled organisms to top predators, practically no level of the ecosystem was left unscathed. During the Pacific marine heat wave, tens of thousands of dead seabirds washed up on beaches, unusually low numbers of humpback whales arrived in their summer habitats, and toxic algal blooms spread along the West Coast of North America.

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Fire in one part of a community can contaminate the water system used by other residents, as Santa Rosa, California, discovered after the Tubbs Fire. Justin Sullivan / Getty Images

By Andrew J. Whelton

More than 58,000 fires scorched the United States last year, and 2021 is on track to be even drier. What many people don't realize is that these wildfires can do lasting damage beyond the reach of the flames – they can contaminate entire drinking water systems with carcinogens that last for months after the blaze. That water flows to homes, contaminating the plumbing, too.

Over the past four years, wildfires have contaminated drinking water distribution networks and building plumbing for more than 240,000 people.

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The new greenhouse will accelerate Lufa's mission to grow food. Lufa

By Sean Fleming

  • The world's largest rooftop greenhouse is in Montreal, Canada.
  • It measures more than 15,000m2 and produces more than 11,000kg of food per week.
  • The company behind it had to hire 200 new employees due to pandemic-driven demand.

Can you grow enough produce for an entire city in rooftop greenhouses? Two entrepreneurs in Montreal, Canada, believe it might be possible.

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Environmental activists carry a large snake pipeline as they protest against the Enbridge Line 3 oil pipeline on May 7, 2021 in Washington, DC. Drew Angerer / Getty Images

By Jessica Corbett

From fake oil spills in Washington, D.C. and New York City to a "people mural" in Seattle spelling out "Defund Line 3," climate and Indigenous protesters in 50 U.S. cities and across seven other countries spanning four continents took to the streets on Friday for a day of action pushing 20 banks to ditch the controversial tar sands pipeline.

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Archeologists made their discoveries in the Karonga District in Northern Malawi. David Wright / University of Oslo

More evidence has emerged that humans have been altering the environment for much longer than the current climate crisis.

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