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In 2015, 75-year old Gerry Suttle was sitting on her porch watching the leaves rustle in the trees when a cop rolled up and handed her an arrest warrant. The reason for her arrest? She had failed to mow her lawn. That's right. The cops and Suttle's neighbors deemed it necessary to hold the threat of arrest over this septuagenarian because the turfgrass occupying the space in front of her house was left unchecked. How did we in the United States come to this? Why is the lawn such a sacred space in white suburban America? This is the story of the American lawn. How it came to be, the complex underpinnings of its green blades, and how we might work to rid ourselves from its cultural grasp.

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Demonstrators on the street during the Global Climate Strike for Future rally in Brussels, Belgium on March 15, 2019. Ana Fernandez / SOPA Images / LightRocket via Getty Images

By Andrea Germanos

Climate campaigners claimed a "historic victory" after a Brussels court on Thursday condemned Belgium for its climate policy that breaches the country's duty of care and human rights obligations.

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Basak Gurbuz Derman / Moment / Getty Images

Your body's immune system is the natural, front line defense to protect you against harmful pathogens and infections. You can boost the effectiveness of your immune system through diet and exercise, but did you know that certain multivitamins can aid your immune system and promote general wellness? Here are our recommendations of the top supplements to help boost your immune system.

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Taxidermists install a coelacanth in a formol-filled tank for the 'Ocean' exhibition ahead of its opening at the National Museum of Natural History (Museum d'Histoire Naturelle) in Paris on March 29, 2019.

CHRISTOPHE ARCHAMBAULT / AFP / Getty Images

French researchers have found that an unusual fish, the coelacanth, can live up to a century, doesn't fully mature until it reaches age 45, and spends years in the womb. Coelacanths are nicknamed, "living fossils."

Previously, it was estimated that the coelacanth was a fast-growing fish that lived for about 20 years. But, the new research published in Current Biology estimates that the fishes' life span is around 100 years. This conclusion was made by studying the coelacanth's scales under polarized light.

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Earth's energy imbalance is on the rise, a new NASA and NOAA study confirms. NASA / Tim Marvel

As the U.S. West continues to bake amidst dangerously high temperatures, a new study from NASA and NOAA confirms that Earth is indeed heating up as the climate crisis persists.

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A flock of chickens in a field. NikonShutterman / iStock / Getty Images Plus

By Jake Johnson

Moving to reverse one of the Trump administration's many corporate-friendly deregulatory actions, the U.S. Department of Agriculture on Thursday announced plans to revive a rule aimed at establishing specific animal welfare standards that food producers must meet to qualify for the USDA's organic seal.

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A brown pelican sits on a railing at the Belmont Veterans Memorial Pier in Long Beach, California on March 14, 2014. Jeff Gritchen / Digital First Media / Orange County Register via Getty Images

Since March, 32 brown pelicans from Huntington Beach, California to San Clemente have been found injured, according to the Wetlands and Wildlife Care Center, a nonprofit that works with injured wildlife in Orange County.

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A 2021 study estimated that shark and ray populations are down 70 percent in the last 50 years, mainly due to overfishing. Mile Ribeiro / Pexels

Last week, on World Oceans Day, the U.S. Senate took two major legislative steps to support our oceans for the future: banning the commercial shark fin trade in the U.S. and addressing forced labor and Illegal, Unreported, and Unregulated (IUU) fishing.

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A new frog species hails from the Ecuadorian Andes and bears the name Pristimantis ledzeppelin, or Led Zeppelin's Rain Frog. David Brito-Zapata

A new species of frog has been described by scientists for the first time, and it's a real rockstar.

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A juvenile North Atlantic right whale (Eubalaena glacialis) breaches as a bulk carrier ship passes near the entrance to St. John's River in Florida in 2006. The species is one of the world's most endangered whales, with fewer than 400 individuals now alive. Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission, NOAA Research Permit #775-1600-10 via Flickr / CC BY-NC-ND 2.0

By Claudia Geib

In the 1980s, video of dolphins dying in fishing nets sparked a public boycott of tuna and the development of "dolphin-safe" labeling programs for canned tuna that have become ubiquitous in many countries. Now, one organization wants to use that model to protect whales from collisions with ships.

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Scarface, the Masai Mara king.

Monica Garliceanu / iStock / Getty Images Plus

A lion with an idiosyncratic face and remarkable mane, called "Scarface," passed away at 14 at his home on one of Africa's most important conservation sites.

Dubbed "Scarface" because of a scar over his right eye, he's sought after by many tourists and conservationists, according to The Guardian.

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The sun sets behind power lines in Los Angeles, California on Sept. 3, 2020, ahead of a heat wave. FREDERIC J. BROWN / AFP via Getty Images

Mutually worsening heat and drought, both fueled by climate change, are stifling the American West, stoking wildfire fears and straining electrical grids — and the worst is far from over.

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Buy-in investments and pre-orders from industry leaders like Virgin Atlantic and American Airlines could help Vertical Aerospace produce the first commercially available electric flying taxis. Vertical Aerospace

Flying taxis to help you skip a morning traffic jam? Sounds like a thing of the future, but the future might be closer than you think.

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