Quantcast

Iconic Yellowstone Wolf Shot Dead in Legal But 'Senseless Killing'

Animals
926F wolf with a glance. Mark Perry / Getty Images

A cherished Lamar Valley wolf known as 926F was shot dead after a legal hunt just five miles outside the sanctuary of Yellowstone National Park, prompting calls from advocacy groups for greater protection of the region's wolves.

Tragically, the 7-year-old female was the daughter of Wolf 06—"the most famous wolf in the world"—who was killed the same way back in December 2012.


"We are heartbroken to share the news that the wolf killed outside the park was 926F of the Lamar Canyon Pack," Wolves of the Rockies wrote Wednesday on Facebook.

The canine was frequently photographed and highly recognizable for a notch in the right ear and a graying face, according to Yellowstone Wolf: Project Citizen Science.

Montana wildlife officials confirmed to the Jackson Hole Daily that the kill on Saturday was state-sanctioned, as it was outside Yellowstone's boundaries.

"It was a legal harvest, and everything was legitimate about the way the wolf was taken," Abby Nelson, a wolf management specialist for Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks, told the publication. "The circumstances are obviously a little bit harder for people to stomach, because that pack had showed signs of habituation."

As detailed by Buckrail, 926F's lineage can be tracked back five generations to Yellowstone's original transplanted wolves from Alberta, Canada. Gray wolves had been hunted eradication by the end of the 1920s. Many decades later, biologists reintroduced the first eight wolves to the park in January 1995, including 926F's great, great grandparents alphas 9F and 10M.

Yellowstone Lamar Canyon Pack 926F and Small Dot www.youtube.com

In a press release about the incident, the Wolf Conservation Center stressed that keystone predators such as wolves are important for a balanced and resilient ecosystem.

The wolves also bring an estimated $35 million in annual tourist revenue to the region, according to University of Montana researchers. Meanwhile, Montana wolf hunting licenses cost $19 for residents and $50 for nonresidents.

"Perhaps Montana should take a closer look at the economics of wolf hunting. Seems that Yellowstone wolves are worth a lot more alive than dead," the conservation group noted.

Fans of 926F, also known as Spitfire, mourned the loss.

"We have all seen the outpouring of grief, rage and anger after the senseless killing of Wolf 926, which unfortunately was a legal kill," Wolves of the Rockies wrote in a Facebook post on Thursday. "It is now time to put that grief, rage and anger to work."

The group suggested contacting elected officials and attending meetings at Montana, Fish Wildlife and Parks to advocate for the animals.

"Let them know who you are and why wolves are important to you," the post states. "Remind them a balanced eco system is in the best interest of everyone."

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

Actress Jane Fonda (C) and actor Sam Waterston (L) participate in a protest in front of the U.S. Capitol during a "Fire Drill Fridays" climate change protest and rally on Capitol Hill, Oct. 18. Mark Wilson / Getty Images News

It appears Jane Fonda is good for her word. The actress and political activist said she would hold demonstrations on Capitol Hill every Friday through January to demand action on the climate crisis. Sure enough, Fonda was arrested for demonstrating a second Friday in a row Oct. 18, according to The Hollywood Reporter. Only this time, her Grace and Frankie co-star Sam Waterston joined her.

Read More Show Less
Visitors look at the Aletsch glacier above Bettmeralp, in the Swiss Alps, on Oct. 1. The mighty Aletsch — the largest glacier in the Alps — could completely disappear by the end of this century if nothing is done to rein in climate change, a study showed on Sept. 12. FABRICE COFFRINI / AFP via Getty Images

Switzerland's two Green parties made historic gains in the country's parliamentary elections Sunday, according to projections based on preliminary results reported by The New York Times.

Read More Show Less
Sponsored
A mural in Richwood, West Virginia, a once booming Appalachia coal town, honors the community's history. Jeff Greenberg / Universal Images Group / Getty Images

By Jeff Turrentine

The coal industry is dying. But we can't allow the communities that have been dependent on coal to die along with it.

Read More Show Less
ThitareeSarmkasat / iStock / Getty Images

by Jillian Kubala, MS, RD

Every fruit lover has their go-to favorites. Bananas, apples, and melons are popular choices worldwide and can be purchased almost anywhere.

Read More Show Less
belchonock / iStock / Getty Images Plus

By Hrefna Palsdottir, MS

Coconut oil is an incredibly healthy fat.

Read More Show Less
Sponsored
Wesley Martinez Da Costa / EyeEm / Getty Images

By David R. Montgomery

Would it sound too good to be true if I was to say that there was a simple, profitable and underused agricultural method to help feed everybody, cool the planet, and revitalize rural America? I used to think so, until I started visiting farmers who are restoring fertility to their land, stashing a lot of carbon in their soil, and returning healthy profitability to family farms. Now I've come to see how restoring soil health would prove as good for farmers and rural economies as it would for the environment.

Read More Show Less
skaman306 / Moment / Getty Images

By Jillian Kubala, MS, RD

Radish (Raphanus sativus) is a cruciferous vegetable that originated in Asia and Europe (1Trusted Source).

Read More Show Less
Tinnakorn Jorruang / iStock / Getty Images

By Dan Nosowitz

The budding research on cannabidiol, or CBD, attracts a great deal of interest in the agricultural field.

Read More Show Less