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9 Stunning Veggie Wedding Bouquets Show New Trend for Brides

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9 Stunning Veggie Wedding Bouquets Show New Trend for Brides

Flowers in your wedding bouquet? That's so passé. Fruits, vegetables, herbs and even mushrooms are all the rage these days for brides looking to ride the latest trend. More and more florists are being asked to create floral arrangements with products such as heirloom carrots, purple kale and citrus fruits.

And, considering the demand for local food right now, it's no surprise that many brides are seeking out local produce for those bouquets. “Over the past few years there has been a definite move away from prim and proper posies, with brides opting for looser and more asymmetric arrangements," Chris Wood, a florist, tells The Telegraph. “Wild and whimsical bouquets are popular, with a heady mix of flowers, foliage, herbs, and fruit and vegetables. Brides are looking for seasonal arrangements and the trend lends itself to locally sourced products.”

Check out these beautiful wedding bouquets:

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