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9 Reasons You Should Eat Cabbage

Health + Wellness

By Diana Herrington

If you want beautiful glowing skin, and an immune system powerful enough to fight off just about anything, don’t forget this highly nutritious but common vegetable.

Cabbage is powerful. Ancient healers declared it contained moon power because it grew in the moonlight. Modern nutritional science understands its power comes from its high sulfur and vitamin C content. Either way—it’s worth adding this powerfood to your weekly diet.

Here are 9 Health Benefits of Cabbage:

1. Ideal for weight loss.
There are only 33 calories in a cup of cooked cabbage, and it is low in fat and high in fiber. It is definitely a smart carb.

Photo courtesy of Shutterstock

2. It is a brain food.
It is full of vitamin K and anthocyanins that help with mental function and concentration. These nutrients also prevent nerve damage, improving your defense against Alzheimer’s disease and dementia. Red cabbage has the highest amount of these power nutrients.

3. High in sulfur, the beautifying mineral.
Cabbage helps dry up oily and acne skin. Internally sulfur is essential for keratin, a protein substance necessary for healthy hair, nails and skin. Check out this homemade cabbage face mask.

4. Helps detoxify the body
.
The high content of vitamin C and sulphur in cabbage removes toxins (free radicals and uric acid), which are the main causes of arthritis, skin diseases, rheumatism and gout.

5. Has well-known cancer preventative
compounds.
The compounds, lupeol, sinigrin and sulforaphane, stimulate enzyme activity and inhibit the growth of cancer tumors. A study on women showed a reduction in breast cancer when cruciferous vegetables like cabbage were added to their diet.

6. Helps keep blood pressure from getting high.

The high potassium content helps by opening up blood vessels, easing the flow of blood.

7. Cabbage for headaches.

A warm compress made with cabbage leaves can help relieve the pain of a headache. Crush cabbage leaves, place in a cloth and apply on the forehead. Also, drink raw cabbage juice, 1-2 oz. (25-50ml) daily for chronic headaches.

8. Hangover relief.
Hangovers from heavy drinking have been reduced by using cabbage, since Roman times.

9. Anti-inflammatory and blood sugar regulator.
The natural red pigments of red cabbage (betalains) is said to lower blood sugar levels and boost insulin production. Of course it has no white sugars and very few simple sugars. Betalains have powerful anti-inflammatory properties just like beets.

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