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8 Ways Coconut Oil Is Healthy for Your Pet

Animals

You’ve probably read about the abundant helpful uses of coconut oil that range from nutritional benefits to household remedies and body care. But, did you know that coconut oil can also benefit your pets?

When I was trying to put extra weight on my labs, Sanchez and Gina, I frequently fed them a tablespoon of coconut oil. They loved licking it right off a spoon. But, that’s only where the benefits start. It turns out that coconut oil can be used for shampoo, toothpaste, paw protection and more.

Photo credit: Lisa Spector

1. Fur Conditioner

In addition to coconut oil being a deep hair conditioner for people, it can do the same for pets, due to it’s natural disinfecting and healing properties. Coconut-Oil-Tips.com says, “medium chain triglycerides are effective antifungal, antibacterial and antiviral compounds.”

Photo credit: Thinkstock

2. Paw Protection

Gina, my Lab pictured in the main photo, started limping last week. Luckily, she’s running at full speed today due to some coconut oil I used to nurse the sore on her paw. And no worries about toxic chemicals if she chooses to lick it off.

Photo credit: Thinkstock

3. Flea Repellent

I live in California with my pups. The flea problem seems worse than ever this year. Traditional flea treatment can often be toxic and it’s effect frequently diminishes over time. No worries about either of those problems with coconut oil. Simply mix 1 part coconut oil with 2 parts water. Boil and then pour into a transporting to a spritzer bottle to lightly spray your pup.

Photo credit: Thinkstock

4. Ear Mite Remedy

Does your pet have itchy ears? How simple does it get? Coconut oil has been used as a natural treatment of ear mites in kittens and other pets.

Photo credit: Thinkstock

5. Pet Toothpaste

Sanchez recently had three teeth extracted. His entire energy has picked up since the removal of his molars. As pleased as I am about the results, he’s 13 and I’m determined that he won’t have to have another oral surgery. So, I recently increased the frequency of his teeth brushing. I just put some coconut oil on a doggie toothbrush and brush away. The best part is that he now loves having his teeth brushed because the flavor is so yummy.

6. Dog Shampoo

A lot of commercial dog shampoos now include coconut oil. But, you can also make your own. FirstHomeLoveLife.com has an easy recipe here. While the coconut oil helps moisturize your pup’s skin, it can also make it greasy until it gets fully absorbed into the fur and skin. You’ll only need a little bit, depending on your dog’s size. It should have the consistency of thick milk or a light cream.

Photo credit: Thinkstock

7. Prevent Hairballs

Adding a bit of coconut oil to your kitty’s diet will not only prevent the hairballs, but it can also help her digestive tract. Coconut-oil-tips.com suggests working up to a teaspoon per day per 10 pounds, so that Kitty’s stomach bacteria stays in balance.

8. Soothes Hotspots and Dry Skin

Whether Buster has a dry nose or a hot spot, coconut oil used topically moisturizes the skin for a variety of pet skin ailments. It can even help disinfect minor injuries. And, again, no problem when Kitty or Buster wants to lick it off.

Dosage for Dogs and Cats:

1 tsp per 10 lbs or 1 Tbsp per 30 lbs

Best Choice of Coconut Oil:

Unrefined virgin coconut oil

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