Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

8 Superfoods You Don't Even Know About

Food
8 Superfoods You Don't Even Know About

Sure, by now we know all about quinoa and kale, but there are plenty of other superfoods just waiting for their time in the spotlight. Read on for some of the healthiest foods that you haven’t heard of.

1. Coconut Flour

Coconut flour might not be a pantry staple for most of us yet, but it should be. The texture and composition of the stuff makes it a unique, stand-alone flour: don’t go substituting it for wheat flour. Its uniqueness is also found in its nutritional content—it’s one of the healthiest flours you can eat, loaded with healthy fats and fiber. And, yep, it’s 100 percent gluten free.

Photo credit: Thinkstock

2. Amaranth

This grain-like seed, native to the Americas, is a tasty breakfast cereal and can even be popped like popcorn. Unlike many other grains and seeds, amaranth is rich in amino acids and minerals like calcium and iron. You can find amaranth at most natural and organic food markets.

Photo credit: Thinkstock

3. Celeriac

Celeriac is a variety of celery that is grown specifically for its root. Though it’s not the most attractive vegetable in the produce aisle, celeriac is a good source of Vitamin B6, fiber, magnesium and potassium. Its taste is similar to celery, but with a little more nuttiness to it and can be prepared much like potatoes.

Photo credit: Thinkstock

Read page 1

4. Fiddleheads

Native to the northeast, these ferns are in season for just a few weeks each spring. Fiddleheads are a bit similar to asparagus in taste with a nuttier undertone. Loaded with vitamins A and C and with good amounts of zinc, protein, iron and riboflavin, if you can find this unique veggie at your local farmer’s market, snatch it up.

Photo credit: Thinkstock

5. Skyr

Though it’s technically a cheese, skyr has been touted as a healthy, new alternative to Greek yogurt. Native to the remote island nation of Iceland, skyr contains plenty of healthy protein and, of course, probiotics. Nutritionally, it’s quite similar to Greek yogurt, but, it’s a bit sweeter and a little thicker.

Photo credit: Thinkstock

6. Purslane

It’s very likely that you have purslane growing in your own backyard—the stuff grows as a weed across the globe, though it is originally from India. Purslane is tastiest when its young and fresh and is an easy substitute for spinach or arugula. And, nutrition-wise, you can’t get much better: purslane is loaded with omega-3 fatty acids, iron, calcium and vitamins A, B and C.

Photo credit: Thinkstock

Read page 1

7. Maca

Home to the same region as that other superstar superfood, quinoa, maca is a dried root flour that is a relative of the radish. In traditional Mayan culture, maca is used to cure ailments ranging from fertility problems to anemia, depression to cancer. It’s loaded with a whole slew of vitamins and minerals and contains many amino and fatty acids. Maca can be prepare like potatoes in its whole form and the powder can be added to smoothies, salads and soups.

Photo credit: Thinkstock

8. Rooibos Tea

Native to Southern Africa, this tea is actually a member of the legume family. Rooibos doesn’t contain caffeine and is relatively mild in flavor. It’s also rich in antioxidants and has been used in traditional medicine to treat respiratory conditions and may help prevent cancer and memory loss. You can find it in many well-stocked tea aisles.

Photo credit: Thinkstock

YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

How Much Vitamin D Do You Need For Optimal Health?

12 High-Carb Foods That Are Incredibly Healthy for You

8 Vegetables You Should Eat Raw

Tearing through the crowded streets of Philadelphia, an electric car and a gas-powered car sought to win a heated race. One that mimicked how cars are actually used. The cars had to stop at stoplights, wait for pedestrians to cross the street, and swerve in and out of the hundreds of horse-drawn buggies. That's right, horse-drawn buggies. Because this race took place in 1908. It wanted to settle once and for all which car was the superior urban vehicle. Although the gas-powered car was more powerful, the electric car was more versatile. As the cars passed over the finish line, the defeat was stunning. The 1908 Studebaker electric car won by 10 minutes. If in 1908, the electric car was clearly the better form of transportation, why don't we drive them now? Today, I'm going to answer that question by diving into the history of electric cars and what I discovered may surprise you.

Read More Show Less

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

A technician inspects a bitcoin mining operation at Bitfarms in Saint Hyacinthe, Quebec on March 19, 2018. LARS HAGBERG / AFP via Getty Images

As bitcoin's fortunes and prominence rise, so do concerns about its environmental impact.

Read More Show Less

Trending

OR-93 traveled hundreds of miles from Oregon to California. Austin Smith Jr. / Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs / California Department of Fish and Wildlife

An Oregon-born wolf named OR-93 has sparked conservation hopes with a historic journey into California.

Read More Show Less
A plume of exhaust extends from the Mitchell Power Station, a coal-fired power plant built along the Monongahela River, 20 miles southwest of Pittsburgh, on Sept. 24, 2013 in New Eagle, Pennsylvania. The plant, owned by FirstEnergy, was retired the following month. Jeff Swensen / Getty Images

By David Drake and Jeffrey York

The Research Brief is a short take about interesting academic work.

The Big Idea

People often point to plunging natural gas prices as the reason U.S. coal-fired power plants have been shutting down at a faster pace in recent years. However, new research shows two other forces had a much larger effect: federal regulation and a well-funded activist campaign that launched in 2011 with the goal of ending coal power.

Read More Show Less
LumiNola / E+ / Getty Images

By Gwen Ranniger

Fertility issues are on the rise, and new literature points to ways that your environment may be part of the problem. We've rounded up some changes you can make in your life to promote a healthy reproductive system.

Read More Show Less