Quantcast

8 Superfoods You Don't Even Know About

Food

Sure, by now we know all about quinoa and kale, but there are plenty of other superfoods just waiting for their time in the spotlight. Read on for some of the healthiest foods that you haven’t heard of.

1. Coconut Flour

Coconut flour might not be a pantry staple for most of us yet, but it should be. The texture and composition of the stuff makes it a unique, stand-alone flour: don’t go substituting it for wheat flour. Its uniqueness is also found in its nutritional content—it’s one of the healthiest flours you can eat, loaded with healthy fats and fiber. And, yep, it’s 100 percent gluten free.

Photo credit: Thinkstock

2. Amaranth

This grain-like seed, native to the Americas, is a tasty breakfast cereal and can even be popped like popcorn. Unlike many other grains and seeds, amaranth is rich in amino acids and minerals like calcium and iron. You can find amaranth at most natural and organic food markets.

Photo credit: Thinkstock

3. Celeriac

Celeriac is a variety of celery that is grown specifically for its root. Though it’s not the most attractive vegetable in the produce aisle, celeriac is a good source of Vitamin B6, fiber, magnesium and potassium. Its taste is similar to celery, but with a little more nuttiness to it and can be prepared much like potatoes.

Photo credit: Thinkstock

Read page 1

4. Fiddleheads

Native to the northeast, these ferns are in season for just a few weeks each spring. Fiddleheads are a bit similar to asparagus in taste with a nuttier undertone. Loaded with vitamins A and C and with good amounts of zinc, protein, iron and riboflavin, if you can find this unique veggie at your local farmer’s market, snatch it up.

Photo credit: Thinkstock

5. Skyr

Though it’s technically a cheese, skyr has been touted as a healthy, new alternative to Greek yogurt. Native to the remote island nation of Iceland, skyr contains plenty of healthy protein and, of course, probiotics. Nutritionally, it’s quite similar to Greek yogurt, but, it’s a bit sweeter and a little thicker.

Photo credit: Thinkstock

6. Purslane

It’s very likely that you have purslane growing in your own backyard—the stuff grows as a weed across the globe, though it is originally from India. Purslane is tastiest when its young and fresh and is an easy substitute for spinach or arugula. And, nutrition-wise, you can’t get much better: purslane is loaded with omega-3 fatty acids, iron, calcium and vitamins A, B and C.

Photo credit: Thinkstock

Read page 1

7. Maca

Home to the same region as that other superstar superfood, quinoa, maca is a dried root flour that is a relative of the radish. In traditional Mayan culture, maca is used to cure ailments ranging from fertility problems to anemia, depression to cancer. It’s loaded with a whole slew of vitamins and minerals and contains many amino and fatty acids. Maca can be prepare like potatoes in its whole form and the powder can be added to smoothies, salads and soups.

Photo credit: Thinkstock

8. Rooibos Tea

Native to Southern Africa, this tea is actually a member of the legume family. Rooibos doesn’t contain caffeine and is relatively mild in flavor. It’s also rich in antioxidants and has been used in traditional medicine to treat respiratory conditions and may help prevent cancer and memory loss. You can find it in many well-stocked tea aisles.

Photo credit: Thinkstock

YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

How Much Vitamin D Do You Need For Optimal Health?

12 High-Carb Foods That Are Incredibly Healthy for You

8 Vegetables You Should Eat Raw

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

A baby burrowing owl perched outside its burrow on Marco Island, Florida. LagunaticPhoto / iStock / Getty Images Plus

Burrowing owls, which make their homes in small holes in the ground, are having a rough time in Florida. That's why Marco Island on the Gulf Coast passed a resolution to pay residents $250 to start an owl burrow in their front yard, as the Marco Eagle reported.

Read More
Amazon and other tech employees participate in the Global Climate Strike on Sept. 20, 2019 in Seattle, Washington. Amazon Employees for Climate Justice continue to protest today. Karen Ducey / Getty Images

Hundreds of Amazon workers publicly criticized the company's climate policies Sunday, showing open defiance of the company following its threats earlier this month to fire workers who speak out on climate change.

Read More
Sponsored
Locusts swarm from ground vegetation as people approach at Lerata village, near Archers Post in Samburu county, approximately 186 miles north of Nairobi, Kenya on Jan. 22. "Ravenous swarms" of desert locusts in Ethiopia, Kenya and Somalia threaten to ravage the entire East Africa subregion, the UN warned on Jan. 20. TONY KARUMBA / AFP / Getty Images

East Africa is facing its worst locust infestation in decades, and the climate crisis is partly to blame.

Read More
The Antarctic Peninsula on Feb. 28, 2019. Daniel Enchev / Flickr

By Dan Morgan

Antarctica is the remotest part of the world, but it is a hub of scientific discovery, international diplomacy and environmental change. It was officially discovered 200 years ago, on Jan. 27, 1820, when members of a Russian expedition sighted land in what is now known as the Fimbul Ice Shelf on the continent's east side.

Read More
The seafood market in Wuhan, China that has been linked to the spread of the new coronavirus. HECTOR RETAMAL / AFP via Getty Images

China banned its trade in wild animals Sunday until the new coronavirus, which was linked to a market in Wuhan where wildlife was sold, is eradicated. Now, conservationists are calling on the country to make the ban permanent.

Read More