Quantcast

8 Superfoods You Don't Even Know About

Food

Sure, by now we know all about quinoa and kale, but there are plenty of other superfoods just waiting for their time in the spotlight. Read on for some of the healthiest foods that you haven’t heard of.

1. Coconut Flour

Coconut flour might not be a pantry staple for most of us yet, but it should be. The texture and composition of the stuff makes it a unique, stand-alone flour: don’t go substituting it for wheat flour. Its uniqueness is also found in its nutritional content—it’s one of the healthiest flours you can eat, loaded with healthy fats and fiber. And, yep, it’s 100 percent gluten free.

Photo credit: Thinkstock

2. Amaranth

This grain-like seed, native to the Americas, is a tasty breakfast cereal and can even be popped like popcorn. Unlike many other grains and seeds, amaranth is rich in amino acids and minerals like calcium and iron. You can find amaranth at most natural and organic food markets.

Photo credit: Thinkstock

3. Celeriac

Celeriac is a variety of celery that is grown specifically for its root. Though it’s not the most attractive vegetable in the produce aisle, celeriac is a good source of Vitamin B6, fiber, magnesium and potassium. Its taste is similar to celery, but with a little more nuttiness to it and can be prepared much like potatoes.

Photo credit: Thinkstock

Read page 1

4. Fiddleheads

Native to the northeast, these ferns are in season for just a few weeks each spring. Fiddleheads are a bit similar to asparagus in taste with a nuttier undertone. Loaded with vitamins A and C and with good amounts of zinc, protein, iron and riboflavin, if you can find this unique veggie at your local farmer’s market, snatch it up.

Photo credit: Thinkstock

5. Skyr

Though it’s technically a cheese, skyr has been touted as a healthy, new alternative to Greek yogurt. Native to the remote island nation of Iceland, skyr contains plenty of healthy protein and, of course, probiotics. Nutritionally, it’s quite similar to Greek yogurt, but, it’s a bit sweeter and a little thicker.

Photo credit: Thinkstock

6. Purslane

It’s very likely that you have purslane growing in your own backyard—the stuff grows as a weed across the globe, though it is originally from India. Purslane is tastiest when its young and fresh and is an easy substitute for spinach or arugula. And, nutrition-wise, you can’t get much better: purslane is loaded with omega-3 fatty acids, iron, calcium and vitamins A, B and C.

Photo credit: Thinkstock

Read page 1

7. Maca

Home to the same region as that other superstar superfood, quinoa, maca is a dried root flour that is a relative of the radish. In traditional Mayan culture, maca is used to cure ailments ranging from fertility problems to anemia, depression to cancer. It’s loaded with a whole slew of vitamins and minerals and contains many amino and fatty acids. Maca can be prepare like potatoes in its whole form and the powder can be added to smoothies, salads and soups.

Photo credit: Thinkstock

8. Rooibos Tea

Native to Southern Africa, this tea is actually a member of the legume family. Rooibos doesn’t contain caffeine and is relatively mild in flavor. It’s also rich in antioxidants and has been used in traditional medicine to treat respiratory conditions and may help prevent cancer and memory loss. You can find it in many well-stocked tea aisles.

Photo credit: Thinkstock

YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

How Much Vitamin D Do You Need For Optimal Health?

12 High-Carb Foods That Are Incredibly Healthy for You

8 Vegetables You Should Eat Raw

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

Yulia Lisitsa / iStock / Getty Images

By Rachael Link, MS, RD

Many people follow the lacto-vegetarian diet for its flexibility and health benefits.

Read More Show Less

By Jared Kaufman

Eating a better diet has been linked with lower levels of heart disease, stroke and type 2 diabetes. But unfortunately 821 million people — about 1 in 9 worldwide — face hunger, and roughly 2 billion people worldwide are overweight or obese, according to the U.N. World Health Organization. In addition, food insecurity is associated with even higher health care costs in the U.S., particularly among older people. To help direct worldwide focus toward solving these issues, the U.N. Sustainable Development Goals call for the elimination of hunger, food insecurity and undernutrition by 2030.

Read More Show Less
Sponsored
Golde Wallingford submitted this photo of "Pure Joy" to EcoWatch's first photo contest. Golde Wallingford

EcoWatch is pleased to announce our third photo contest!

Read More Show Less
Healthline

Made from the freshly sprouted leaves of Triticum aestivum, wheatgrass is known for its nutrient-dense and powerful antioxidant properties.

Read More Show Less

mevans / E+ / Getty Images

The federal agency that manages the Great Barrier Reef issued an unprecedented statement that broke ranks with Australia's conservative government and called for urgent action to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, according to the Guardian.

Read More Show Less
Sponsored

A powerful earthquake struck near Athens, Greece and shook the capital city for 15 seconds on Friday, causing people to run into the streets to escape the threat of falling buildings, NBC News reported.

Read More Show Less
U.S. government scientists concluded in a new report that last month was the hottest June on record. Angelo Juan Ramos / Flickr

By Jessica Corbett

As meteorologists warned Thursday that temperatures above 100°F are expected to impact two-thirds of the country this weekend, U.S. government scientists revealed that last month was the hottest June ever recorded — bolstering calls for radical global action on the climate emergency.

Read More Show Less
Rod Waddington / CC BY-SA 2.0

By John R. Platt

For years now conservationists have warned that many of Madagascar's iconic lemur species face the risk of extinction due to rampant deforestation, the illegal pet trade and the emerging market for the primates' meat.

Yes, people eat lemurs, and the reasons they do aren't exactly what we might expect.

Read More Show Less