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8 States Pave Road For 3.3 Million Electric Vehicles by 2025

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Eight governors pledged to do their part in putting 3.3 million zero-emissions vehicles (ZEV) on the road by 2025 back in October, and now they have laid out an 11-step plan to do so.

The states—California, Connecticut, Maryland, Massachusetts, New York, Oregon, Rhode Island and Vermont—issued a joint report this week that reveals their plans, as well as the progress they have made toward making U.S. roads a bit greener. Known as the ZEV Program Implementation Task Force, the leaders have identified the priorities, coordination methods and more to conquer one of the biggest challenges in reaching the 3.3 million goal—developing measures that make electric vehicle and hybrid ownership valuable for all parties.

The study also highlights the upward trend of EVs. So far, there are about 190,000 of them on the roads and highways.

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"The progress we’ve made so far should give us confidence that we can take electric cars to the next level," Travis Madsen, global warming solutions program manager at Environment America, said in a statement. 

“By adopting consumer incentives and other key policies, the plan released today can help make electric cars as convenient, affordable and widespread as cars currently powered by oil. This is a crucial strategy to protect our children and future generations from the worst impacts of global warming—and it will help protect our health by cleaning up air pollution."

Here are the 11 steps established by the ZEV Program Implementation Task Force:

  • Promote the availability and effective marketing of all plug-in EV models in participating states

  • Provide consumer incentives to enhances the ZEV ownership experience

  • Lead by example through increasing ZEVS in state, municipal and other public fleets

  • Encourage private fleets to purchase, lease or rent ZEVs

  • Promote working place charging

  • Promote ZEV infrastructure planning and investment by public and private entities

  • Provide clear and accurate signage to direct ZEV users to charging and fueling stations and parking

  • Remove barriers to ZEV charging and fueling stations installations

  • Promote access, compatibility and interoperability of the plug-in EV charging network

  • Remove barriers to the retail sale of electricity and hydrogen as transportation fuels and promote competitive plug-in EV charging rates

  • Track and report progress toward meeting the goal of 3.3 million ZEVs on the states' roadways by 2025.

"This plan is designed to guide interstate coordination and advise state-specific action. It is not intended to provide a uniform pathway for all states to follow," the report reads.

"Each state will promote ZEV market growth in ways that best address its own needs."

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